To Be Prepared for War

Peace through strength is an ancient concept. It was the Roman modus operandi as Rome expanded her influence across the known world. It was also the policy pursued by our very own George Washington. In our modern world of appeasement and surrender to the forces of tyranny, maintaining peace through strength has become a uniquely American custom. It is not only the national policy followed by great American presidents, but that which is followed by American gun owners every day. Peace through strength, then, is part of the true American heritage.

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In his first annual message to Congress, President George Washington stated: “To be prepared for War is one of the most effectual means of preserving peace.” In the very next breath, he continued: “A free people ought not only to be armed but disciplined” (George Washington, First Annual Message to Congress, January 8, 1790). When you examine the annals of history, whether you look in ancient Israel, manly Sparta, gallant Rome, or in the American Republic, you find that free people have always been armed. Indeed, arms in the hands of freemen distinguishes them from serfs and slaves.

The philosophy “peace through strength” derives from common sense and practical experience. All human experience shows that unscrupulous men, criminals, and tyrants, prey upon the defenseless and weak. Evil people are frequently cowards and their victims are usually targets of opportunity. And no one is more defenseless and presents an easier target than the unarmed and weak. This is the reason why lunatics choose to shoot people in gun-free zones rather than in locations where free men and women are armed and able to defend themselves.

The same is true of nations. An Evil Empire like the Soviet Union preys upon weak nations. They backpedal and try to negotiate (though they only make deals when it benefits them) when a nation presents a strong and united front against them. Instead of launching a risky frontal assault, they resort to subversion, infiltration, psychological warfare, terrorism, and guerrilla tactics in order to demoralize, weaken, corrupt, confuse, and undermine an opponent before they ever attempt conquest by force.

Communist Russia and Red China will never attempt to take down the United States through force of arms unless we have been sufficiently degraded on the inside first. Unfortunately, that horrific day is swift approaching as cultural Marxism (i.e. feminism, LGBT, radical environmentalism, “civil rights” movements, political correctness, etc.) rips through our vital institutions. We are becoming a weak nation because we have been too politically correct to stand up to the Reds and to call a spade a spade. We are so afraid of offending someone, hurting their feelings, or causing a stir that we suffer abuses and reductions in our personal rights and national influence rather than boldly confront the enemy.

When necessary, a free society must use its arms and strength to defend itself. This should be a last resort to preserve peace, but it must be an option. A nation that is not prepared to defend itself presents a soft target to an aggressor. The Red Chinese commonly refer to the United States as a “paper tiger” that doesn’t have the stomach for a long struggle. They think we are weak and will eventually crumble because they have yet to see us stand up and confront them in a meaningful way. Islamic terrorists (which are primarily trained and funded by Soviet Russia) hold this same philosophy. America’s enemies cannot be appeased or bought off – appeasement only emboldens them.

We learned through our experiences with Barbary pirates at the beginning of our Republic that buying peace with tribute makes our enemies insatiable and actually increases the problem. Because of a lack of naval power at the time, President Washington was forced to pay the Islamic pirates who were raiding our ships rather than face them in battle. President John Adams did the same while creating a navy that could eventually contend with overseas opponents.

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President Thomas Jefferson was the first president to use our newly minted Navy and Marines to punish the pirates and defend America’s vital international trade. After the War of 1812, President Madison sent the U.S. Navy to the Mediterranean to finish what President Jefferson had started. Our Navy devastated the pirates, ensuring peace between the United States and the Barbary States for generations. We learned from this episode that peaceful relations can only be established with hostile states by standing up to them or crushing them with overwhelming strength. Evil people and regimes only bow to power.

Because of his experience as a colonel during the French-Indian War and as commander-in-chief of the Continental Army during the Revolution, President George Washington understood this principle perhaps better than anyone. It infuriated him that the United States did not have the means to deal with enemies who ruthlessly attacked peaceful trading vessels and harmed Americans and America’s interests. In a letter to the Marquis de Lafayette, he raged:

“[H]ow is it possible the great maritime powers of Europe should submit to pay an annual tribute to the little piratical States of Barbary. Would to Heaven we had a navy able to reform those enimies to mankind, or crush them into nonexistence” (George Washington to Marquis de Lafayette, August 15, 1786).

Washington understood that only an armed society – both on a personal and a national level – could retain their Freedom against the multitude of adversaries and tyrants that abound in the world. He knew that freemen could only remain so if they were strong and projected their strength. Part of this was to always be ready for war so that a potential aggressor would think twice before attacking – and so that he would severely regret it if he did.

At the beginning of our War for Independence, General Washington encouraged his troops to stand firm against British tyrants. He said:

“[T]he hour is fast approaching, on which the Honor and Success of this army, and the safety of our bleeding Country depend. Remember officers and Soldiers, that you are Freemen, fighting for the blessings of Liberty—that slavery will be your portion, and that of your posterity, if you do not acquit yourselves like men . . . every one for himself resolving to conquer, or die, and trusting to the smiles of heaven upon so just a cause, will behave with Bravery and Resolution” (George Washington, General Orders, August 23, 1776).

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The “smiles of heaven” only rain down upon those who take the pains to defend themselves and increase their own human strength. Only the vigorous and valiant are worthy of divine intervention and blessings. Only by “fighting for the blessings of Liberty,” and remaining virtuous, can Americans remain freemen. And all real freemen are soldiers – warriors for justice, truth, and Liberty.

All true freemen are armed and prepared for battle at a moment’s notice – whether against a domestic enemy or against an invader. This is precisely why Samuel Adams envisioned America as a “Christian Sparta” (Samuel Adams to John Scollay, December 30, 1780). Like the Spartans, “molon labe,” or “come and take it,” would be our war cry. It was strict adherence to this principle of preparing for war and being ready to defend the peace, coupled with faithful obedience to God’s laws, that made America great. And the same course can make America great again.

Similar to Washington and Adams, Thomas Jefferson believed that strength was a means of preventing war. He wished every American freeman to be a soldier. He stated:

“[T]he Greeks and Romans had no standing armies, yet they defended themselves. the Greeks by their laws, and the Romans by the spirit of their people, took care to put into the hands of their rulers no such engine of oppression, as a standing army. their system was to make every man a soldier, & oblige him to repair to the standard of his country, whenever that was reared. this made them invincible; and the same remedy will make us so” (Thomas Jefferson to Thomas Cooper, September 10, 1814).

This remedy – namely, to arm and discipline our citizens in the art of war – would make America “invincible” to foreign threats so long as we also remain virtuous. A free nation that expects to remain free must be prepared for war. We prepare for war but pray for peace. As Thomas Paine expressed it: “Those who expect to reap the blessings of freedom, must, like men, undergo the fatigues of supporting it” (Thomas Paine, The American Crisis, No. 4, September 12, 1777).

The phrase “peace through strength,” in its modern context, was popularized by Ronald Reagan during his 1980 campaign against socialist appeaser Jimmy Carter. For eight years, President Reagan preached peace through strength and tried to get America back to her roots. While President Reagan was only marginally successful in his gigantic task, reminding ourselves of some of his inspiring thoughts seems appropriate.

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During one of the presidential debates with then President Jimmy Carter, candidate Reagan said:

“Now, I believe, also that this meeting, this mission, this responsibility for preserving the peace, which I believe is a responsibility peculiar to our country, that we cannot shirk our responsibility as the leader of the Free World, because we’re the only one that can do it. And therefore, the burden of maintaining the peace falls on us. And to maintain that peace requires strength. America has never gotten in a war because we were too strong” (Reagan/Carter presidential debate, October 28, 1980).

In a speech to the American People regarding national security, President Reagan explained the need for strength to combat the Red menace – the exact same menace we face today at home and abroad. He rightly observed:

“We know that peace is the condition under which mankind was meant to flourish. Yet peace does not exist of its own will. It depends on us, on our courage to build it and guard it and pass it on to future generations. . . .

“. . . American strength is . . . a sheltering arm for freedom in a dangerous world. Strength is the most persuasive argument we have to convince our adversaries to negotiate seriously and to cease bullying other nations.

“. . . American power is the indispensable element of a peaceful world. . . .

“But it is not just the immense Soviet arsenal that puts us on our guard. The record of Soviet behavior – the long history of Soviet brutality toward those who are weaker – reminds us that the only guarantee of peace and freedom is our military strength and our national will. The peoples of Afghanistan and Poland, of Czechoslavakia and Cuba, and so many other captive countries – they understand this.

“Some argue that our dialogue with the Soviets means we can treat defense more casually. Nothing could be further from the truth. It was our seriousness about defense that created the climate in which serious talks could finally begin. . . .

“Our job is to provide for our security by using the strengths of our free society” (Ronald Reagan, speech, February 26, 1986).

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Think about it, who is more likely to persuade a thug to put down his gun – an unarmed negotiator with no leverage or a seasoned police officer with a raised rifle? The answer is obvious. Though the Soviets have broken literally every treaty they ever signed with the United States, they were wary of President Reagan because they knew that he would not hesitate, if necessary, to launch nuclear missiles and a full-scale war against the communists in defense of America and the West.

One of my favorite Ronald Reagan moments demonstrates President Reagan’s willingness to stand up to the communist threat. It occurred on August 11, 1984, when President Reagan told a joke. Though clearly a joke, it contained a large kernel of truth. During a microphone sound check prior to his speech, President Reagan mused: “My fellow Americans, I’m pleased to tell you today that I’ve signed legislation that will outlaw Russia forever. We begin bombing in five minutes.”

I can’t listen to the audio recording of this classic moment without laughing. Yet, the Soviets weren’t laughing – and not because Russians don’t have much of a sense of humor. Rather, these communists – who consider themselves in a permanent state of war with the West – understood that in Ronald Reagan they had a man who would not cower in fear, kow-tow to Moscow, or back down to Soviet advances. Evil regimes like the Soviet Union only gain momentum unless forcibly stopped in their tracks and resisted manfully by one of equal or greater strength.

President Reagan’s views were inspired by his belief that God founded this country and that we are not only exceptional, but that we have a mission to lead the world by our shining example:

“I’ve always believed that this land was set aside in an uncommon way, that a divine plan placed this great continent between the oceans to be found by a people from every corner of the earth who had a special love of faith, freedom and peace. Let us reaffirm America’s destiny of goodness and goodwill” (Ronald Reagan, Thanksgiving message, 1982).

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Part of being the world leader is helping to preserve peace when it is within our sphere of influence and duty. President Reagan rightly affirmed:

“We’re not a warlike people. Quite the opposite. We always seek to live in peace. We resort to force infrequently and with great reluctance, and only after we’ve determined that it’s absolutely necessary. We are awed – and rightly so – by the forces of destruction at loose in the world in this nuclear era. But neither can we be naive or foolish. Four times in my lifetime America has gone to war, bleeding the lives of its young men into the sands of island beachheads, the fields of Europe, and the jungles and rice paddies of Asia. We know only too well that war comes not when the forces of freedom are strong; it is when they are weak that tyrants are tempted. . . .

“Of all the objectives we seek, first and foremost is the establishment of lasting world peace. We must always stand ready to negotiate in good faith, ready to pursue any reasonable avenue that holds forth the promise of lessening tensions and furthering the prospects of peace. But let our friends and those who may wish us ill take note: the United States has an obligation to its citizens and to the people of the world never to let those who would destroy freedom dictate the future course of life on this planet” (Ronald Reagan, Republican National Convention acceptance speech, July 17, 1980).

Is America today up to the task of being great and exceptional? Are we prepared to increase our unique national strength by fortifying our Faith, Families, and Freedom? And are we prepared to defend these fundamental institutions, and this Promised Land with her unsurpassed resources and beauty and potential, with the strength of arms and military might if necessary? Are we truly prepared to make the ultimate sacrifice to ensure that the blessings of Liberty we take for granted will extend to our posterity? If today we are not prepared for war to safeguard our peace, our rights, and our homes, we are not worthy of the title American.

General George Washington’s wise words of encouragement to his fighting men should pound once more in our ears. Two days before America formally declared Independence from British tyranny, General Washington wrote to his patriot soldiers to embolden them in their fight. He reminded them what was at stake – slavery or Freedom. He explained that all eyes were fixed on them and that they would decide whether tyranny or Freedom was to reign in America. And he explained the eternal truth that freemen motivated by the just cause of Liberty and aided by the God of Heaven are more fearsome than any conquering army ever can be. General Washington declared:

“The time is now near at hand which must probably determine, whether Americans are to be, Freemen, or Slaves; whether they are to have any property they can call their own; whether their Houses, and Farms, are to be pillaged and destroyed, and they consigned to a State of Wretchedness from which no human efforts will probably deliver them. The fate of unborn Millions will now depend, under God, on the Courage and Conduct of this army—Our cruel and unrelenting Enemy leaves us no choice but a brave resistance, or the most abject submission; this is all we can expect—We have therefore to resolve to conquer or die: Our own Country’s Honor, all call upon us for a vigorous and manly exertion, and if we now shamefully fail, we shall become infamous to the whole world. Let us therefore rely upon the goodness of the Cause, and the aid of the supreme Being, in whose hands Victory is, to animate and encourage us to great and noble Actions—The Eyes of all our Countrymen are now upon us, and we shall have their blessings, and praises, if happily we are the instruments of saving them from the Tyranny meditated against them. Let us therefore animate and encourage each other, and shew the whole world, that a Freeman contending for LIBERTY on his own ground is superior to any slavish mercenary on earth” (George Washington, General Orders, July 2, 1776).

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Today, the eyes of the weary world are upon America. For years we have let them down. Our example has been less than exceptional, not particularly notable, and, in recent times, not worthy of duplication. We have allowed the communist cancer to eat away at our vitals until now we stand on the brink of civil war, mobocracy, economic collapse, open persecution of Christians and constitutionalists, and full-scale societal breakdown.

Notwithstanding how far we’ve fallen through our own neglect and rejection of God’s eternal laws, we have it within our power to step forward, do our duty, and restore our Republic. There will be sacrifices to make – and some patriots will lose their lives because Freedom is never won except at the price of blood – but we must make them for our sake, the sake of our posterity, and the sake of a beleaguered world that desperately needs us to lead.

I close with the rousing words of Ronald Reagan. Each syllable is true. Every vowel applies to me and to you in our present situation. The burden for the future rests squarely on our shoulders. If we shirk our duty now when it matters most, history will hold us in contempt. Let us be real men and real Americans. Let us honor the American tradition of preserving peace through strength and in always being prepared for war in order to secure an honorable peace. Let us be freemen worthy to be mentioned in the same breath as General Washington and his patriot army. God bless us and God bless America!

“If we lose freedom here, there is no place to escape to. This is the last stand on Earth. . . .

“Alexander Hamilton said, “A nation which can prefer disgrace to danger is prepared for a master, and deserves one.” Let’s set the record straight. There is no argument over the choice between peace and war, but there is only one guaranteed way you can have peace — and you can have it in the next second — surrender.

“Admittedly there is a risk in any course we follow other than this, but every lesson in history tells us that the greater risk lies in appeasement, and this is the specter our well-meaning liberal friends refuse to face — that their policy of accommodation is appeasement, and it gives no choice between peace and war, only between fight and surrender . . . And therein lies the road to war, because those voices don’t speak for the rest of us. You and I know and do not believe that life is so dear and peace so sweet as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery. . . .

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“You and I have a rendezvous with destiny. We will preserve for our children this, the last best hope of man on earth, or we will sentence them to take the first step into a thousand years of darkness.” (Ronald Reagan, “A Time for Choosing,” October 27, 1964).

Zack Strong,

August 28, 2019.

Indispensable Men: George Washington

“[A]n impartial World will say with you that he is the Greatest Man on Earth.” – William Hooper to Robert Morris, February 1, 1777.

Numerous patriots came together to bring about and accomplish America’s War for Independence, write her Constitution, and establish our cherished Republic. Among these patriots, several stalwart figures stand out as vital to the cause. These are the indispensable men America needed and without whom our bid for Independence would have failed. This “Indispensable Men” series pays tribute to these larger-than-life heroes and the role they played in giving Liberty a proper home.

Hundreds of books, biographies, and documentaries have been produced telling the technical details and stories of George Washington’s upbringing, career, family, and home life, and the interworkings of his presidential administration and command as general. I don’t feel the need to reproduce those facts here. I simply refer you to the best book I know of on Washington’s life and achievements; namely, The Real George Washington written by Jay A. Parry, Andrew M. Allison, and W. Cleon Skousen and published by the National Center for Constitutional Studies. My aim in this series is, rather, to highlight the key ideas, crucial character traits, and most notable public achievements of the “indispensable” figures in the story of American Freedom.

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No man more deserves the first spot on the “indispensable men” list than George Washington, the great general of the Revolution and the Father of our Country. The unchallenged historical consensus is that no man was more respected and admired in our founding era than George Washington. Washington’s impressive record demonstrates the great trust his countrymen had in him and speaks to the tremendous influence he had in his day.

A brief index of George Washington’s public achievements and prominent positions looks like this:

1) Washington began his public service as a soldier. During the French and Indian War, Washington gained valuable command experience and reputation and was promoted to the rank of colonel in the Virginia militia.

2) In 1774, he was elected as a Virginia delegate to the First and Second Continental Congresses. During the Second Continental Congress, the Continental Army was created and George Washington was chosen as its commander-in-chief.

3) During the War for Independence, General Washington served as the supreme leader of the Continental Army, saved the Army from defeat numerous times through his skill and decisive will power, and brought the conflagration to a successful conclusion.

4) Four years after humbly resigning his charge as commander-in-chief and retiring to his plantation in 1783, Washington helped orchestrate the Constitutional Convention to save the faltering nation. Washington was unanimously elected as the president of the Convention.

5) In 1789, Washington became the first president of our Republic and to this day is the only man to ever be unanimously elected by the Electoral College. He in fact accomplished this feat twice, speaking to the level of admiration and trust given to him by his contemporaries. The later federal capital district was also named in his honor.

Being a successful military general, a unanimously-elected head of state, the president of the Convention which produced the longest-standing national charter in history, and having a national capitol named in your honor, are things that not many other people can put on a resume. On paper, then, there is zero doubt that George Washington deserves a seat at the “indispensable men” table. But there was much more to his rave popularity than merely holding prominent positions during monumental events.

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Washington’s positions as general and president, as noteworthy as they are, did not make others respect him. Rather, Washington was appointed and elected to those positions because of the supreme respect and admiration others already had for him. And this admiration was engendered by his strong character and unique spirit. Historian Gordon Wood has written:

“Washington’s genius, Washington’s greatness, lay in his character. He was, as Chateaubriand said, a “hero of an unprecedented kind.” There had never been a great man quite like Washington . . . Washington became a great man and was acclaimed as a classical hero because of the way he conducted himself during times of temptation. It was his moral character that set him off from other men.

“Washington epitomized everything the revolutionary generation prized in its leaders. He had character and was truly a man of virtue. This virtue was not given to him by nature. He had to work for it, to cultivate it, and everyone sensed that. Washington was a self-made hero, and this impressed an eighteenth-century enlightened world that put great stock in men’s controlling both their passions and their destinies. Washington seemed to possess a self-cultivated nobility” (Gordon S. Wood, Revolutionary Characters: What Made the Founders Different, 34-35).

Yet, it is not what modern historians have said about Washington that is so remarkable. Rather, the fact that the American People and his contemporaries in governmental affairs, and even his enemies across the sea, lavished him with praise. We now rehearse some of the acclaim this man received by those who knew him and were in a position to judge the sincerity and depth of his character.

Thomas Jefferson was intimately acquainted with Washington both before he was appointed general and throughout his time in military and government service. Jefferson wrote to future president James Monroe of Washington’s mass appeal in these words:

“Congress have risen. You will have seen by their proceedings the truth of what I always observed to you, that one man outweighs them all in influence over the people who have supported his judgment against their own and that of their representatives. Republicanism must lie on it’s oars, resign the vessel to it’s pilot, and themselves to the course he thinks best for them” (Thomas Jefferson to James Monroe, June 12, 1796).

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Another time, Jefferson gave an in-depth evaluation of Washington’s character and many of his traits, including his sense of justice, his reasoning abilities, and his will power. I do not quote everything Jefferson said, but enough to demonstrate why Washington was so revered by his associates:

“I think I knew General Washington intimately and thoroughly; and were I called on to delineate his character it should be in terms like these.

“His mind was great and powerful, without being of the very first order; his penetration strong, tho’ not so acute as that of a Newton, Bacon or Locke; and as far as he saw, no judgment was ever sounder. it was slow in operation, being little aided by invention or imagination, but sure in conclusion. hence the common remark of his officers, of the advantage he derived from councils of war, where hearing all suggestions, he selected whatever was best. and certainly no General ever planned his battles more judiciously . . . he was incapable of fear, meeting personal dangers with the calmest unconcern. perhaps the strongest feature in his character was prudence, never acting until every circumstance, every consideration was maturely weighed; refraining if he saw a doubt, but, when once decided, going through with his purpose whatever obstacles opposed. his integrity was most pure, his justice the most inflexible I have ever known, no motives of interest or consanguinity, of friendship or hatred, being able to bias his decision. he was indeed, in every sense of the words, a wise, a good, & a great man . . . his person, you know, was fine, his stature exactly what one would wish, his deportment easy, erect, and noble; the best horseman of his age, and the most graceful figure that could be seen on horseback . . . on the whole, his character was, in it’s mass perfect, in nothing bad, in few points indifferent; and it may truly be said that never did nature and fortune combine more perfectly to make a man great, and to place him in the same constellation with whatever worthies have merited from man an everlasting remembrance. for his was the singular destiny & merit of leading the armies of his country succesfully thro’ an arduous war for the establishment of it’s independance, of conducting it’s councils thro’ the birth of a government, new in it’s forms and principles, until it had settled down into a quiet and orderly train, and of scrupulously obeying the laws, thro’ the whole of his career, civil and military, of which the history of the world furnishes no other example . . . I am satisfied the great body of republicans thinks of him as I do . . . and I am convinced he is more deeply seated in the love and gratitude of the republicans, than in the Pharisaical homage of the Federal monarchists. for he was no monarchist from preference of his judgment. the soundness of that gave him correct views of the rights of man, and his severe justice devoted him to them. he has often declared to me that he considered our new constitution as an experiment on the practicability of republican government, and with what dose of liberty man could be trusted for his own good: that he was determined the experiment should have a fair trial, and would lose the last drop of his blood in support of it. . . .

“These are my opinions of General Washington, which I would vouch at the judgment seat of god, having been formed on an acquaintance of 30. years . . . I felt on his death, with my countrymen, that ‘verily a great man hath fallen this day in Israel’” (Thomas Jefferson to Walter Jones, January 2, 1814).

High praise, indeed! And higher still coming from a man the caliber of Thomas Jefferson! As Jefferson noted, he was hardly the only person to share these elevated feelings. Most Americans at the time looked upon Washington as an exalted figure – a national savior of sorts.

Benjamin Franklin, a man whose own unique talents and achievements had few equals, had high esteem for Washington. When it came time to elect a new president under the Constitution, Franklin had only one man in mind: “General Washington is the man that all our eyes are fixed on for President, and what little influence I may have, is devoted to him” (Benjamin Franklin to M. Le Veillard, June 8, 1788).

John and Abigail Adams both had high praise for the man. John Adams noted: “He is brave, wise, generous and humane” (John Adams to William Tudor, June 20, 1775). And after meeting Washington in person, Abigail privately told John: “I was struck with General Washington, You had prepared me to entertain a favorable opinion of him, but I thought the one half was not told me. Dignity with ease, and complacency, the Gentleman and Soldier look agreeably blended in him. Modesty marks every line and feature of his face” (Abigail Adams to John Adams, July 16, 1775).

In his autobiography, John Adams likewise praised Washington as the principal man of the age. He wrote: “I thought him a perfectly honest Man, with an amiable and excellent heart, and the most important Character at that time among Us, for he was the center of our Union” (John Adams, Autobiography, 1777).

The Marquis de Lafayette, the famous Frenchman who assisted in our War for Independence, once observed:

“This great man has no enemies but those of his own country, and yet every noble and sensitive soul must love the excellent qualities of his heart . . . His honesty, his candor, his sensitivity, his virtue in the full sense of the word are above all praise” (Marquis de Lafayette to Baron von Steuben, March 12, 1778).

Another French observer wrote:

“General Washington conducts himself with his usual wisdom. It conciliates to him more and more the respect and affection of the people. After a war of eight years, during which he has scarcely ever left his army, and has never taken any repose, he has received the news of the peace with the greatest joy. It made him shed tears, and he said it was the happiest hour of his life . . . He will always be the first citizen of the United States . . . all the world is agreed touching his republican virtues, and agreed that there is no character more eminent among those who have taken part in this grand revolution” (Chevalier de La Luzerne to the Comte de Vergennes, March 29, 1783).

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Benjamin Rush, another prominent figure of the day, spoke extravagantly of Washington’s character: “His zeal, his disinterestedness, his activity, his politeness, and his manly behavior . . . have captivated the hearts of the public and his friends. He seems to be one of those illustrious heroes whom providence raises up once in three or four hundred years to save a nation from ruin . . . he has so much martial dignity in his deportment that you would distinguish him to be a general and a soldier from among ten thousand people. There is not a king in Europe that would not look like a valet de chamber by his side” (Benjamin Rush to Thomas Ruston, October 29, 1775).

At the height of the Revolution, Moses Hazen remarked to General Nathanael Greene that Washington “is the very Idol of His Country, and who I love, regard, and Esteem, as one of the best men since the Creation of Adam” (Moses Hazen to Nathanael Greene, July 24, 1780). General Greene had similar praise for his superior officer. Not long after Hazen made his statements, General Greene explained:

“It is my opinion that General Washington’s influence will do more than all the Assemblies upon the Continent. I always thought him exceeding popular, but in many places he is little less than adored; and universally admired. His influence in this Country might possibly effect something great” (Nathanael Greene, January 10, 1781).

In 1791, a newspaper, the Connecticut Courant, gushed with praise for the nation’s first chief executive:

“Many a private man might make a great President; but will there ever be a President who will make so great a man as WASHINGTON?” (Connecticut Courant, June 20, 1791, in John P. Kaminski, ed., The Founders on the Founders: Word Portraits from the American Revolutionary Era, 505).

Shortly after Washington’s death, Timothy Dwight made this observation:

“Wherever he appeared, an instinctive awe and veneration attended him on the part of all men. Every man, however great in his own opinion, or in reality, shrunk in his presence, and became conscious of an inferiority, which he never felt before. Whilst he encouraged every man, particularly every stranger, and peculiarly ever diffident man, and raised him to self possession, no sober person, however secure he might think himself of his esteem, ever presumed to draw too near him” (Timothy Dwight, “Discourse on the Character of Washington,” February 22, 1800).

John Marshall, the fourth chief justice of the Supreme Court, shared the sentiment so often expressed that Washington was the “greatest man in the world.” Days after General Washington’s resignation, Marshall stated:

“At length then the military career of the greatest Man on earth is closed. May happiness attend him wherever he goes. May he long enjoy those blessings he has secured to his Country. When I speak or think of that superior Man my full heart overflows with gratitude. Ma he ever experience from his Countrymen those attentions which such sentiments of themselves produce” (John Marshall to James Monroe, January 3, 1784).

These few lines from John Price demonstrate the awe people had for the General of their blessed Revolution: “Immortal Washington . . . has outshined and Eclipsed all Asiatic, African, and European Generals, and Commanders from the Creation of the World, to this Day” (John Price to John Jay, October 29, 1783).

Samuel Shaw, a distinguished military officer under Washington, expressed his keen feelings about his General in these words:

“Our army love our General very much, but yet they have one thing against him, which is the little care he takes of himself in action. His personal bravery, and the desire he has of animating his troops by example, make him fearless of any danger. This, while it makes him appear great, occasions us much uneasiness. But Heaven, who has hitherto been his shield, I hope will still continue to guard so valuable a life” (Samuel Shaw to Francis Show, January 7, 1777).

William Hooper once wrote of Washington’s invaluable role in maintaining and securing the Revolution:

“When it shall be consistent with policy to give the history of that man from his first introduction into our service, how often America has been rescued from ruin by the mere strength of his genius, conduct & courage encountering every obstacle that want of money, men, arms, Ammunition could throw in his way, an impartial World will say with you that he is the Greatest Man on Earth. Misfortunes are the Element in which he shines. They are the Groundwork on which his picture appears to the greatest advantage. He rises superior to them all, they serve as foils to his fortitude, and as stimulants to bring into view those great qualities which in the serenity of life his great modesty keeps concealed. I could fill the side in his praise, but anything I can say cannot equal his Merits” (William Hooper to Robert Morris, February 1, 1777).

Washington’s fame was celebrated throughout Europe as well as America – even in the midst of the War for Independence. While on assignment in France, Benjamin Franklin wrote to Washington: “I frequently hear the old Generals of this martial Country, (who study the Maps of America, and mark upon them all your Operations) speak with sincere Approbation & great Applause of your Conduct, and join in giving you the Character of one of the greatest Captains of the Age” (Benjamin Franklin to George Washington, March 5, 1780).

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King George III, the tyrant who abuses prompted the Americans into fighting for their Liberty and declaring Independence from Britain, developed an interesting opinion of Washington after the war. Rufus King recorded a conversation he had with Benjamin West who had spoken with King George III about affairs in America. King’s account reads:

“[I]n regard to General Washington, he [King George] told him [West] since his [Washington’s] resignation that in his opinion “that act closing and finishing what had gone before and viewed in connection with it, placed him in a light the most distinguished of any man living, and that he thought him the greatest character of the age”” (Rufus King, May 3, 1797, in King, The Life and Correspondence of Rufus King, Vol. 3, 545).

It is likewise my estimation that George Washington was one of the “greatest Captains of the Age,” that he was an “illustrious hero” whom the God of Heaven raised up to save his country, and that he was the foremost of the indispensable men who established American Liberty. My own religious creed and the impressions of the Holy Spirit on my soul cause me to declare that George Washington was indeed raised up by the hand of the Lord to preside over the founding of this Republic. I am proud to live in a nation founded and shaped by George Washington.

George Washington’s guiding light, the thing that propelled him to the greatness ascribed to him by his peers, was his inner conviction about God. Though it is common today to call Washington and other Founding Fathers “Deists,” or, worse, “atheists,” the fact is that Washington was a deeply committed Christian. Washington issued the following General Orders  to his fighting men on May 2, 1788.

“The Commander in Chief directs that divine Service be performed every sunday at 11 oClock in those Brigades to which there are Chaplains—those which have none to attend the places of worship nearest to them—It is expected that Officers of all Ranks will by their attendence set an Example to their men.

“While we are zealously performing the duties of good Citizens and soldiers we certainly ought not to be inattentive to the higher duties of Religion—To the distinguished Character of Patriot, it should be our highest Glory to add the more distinguished Character of Christian—The signal Instances of providential Goodness which we have experienced and which have now almost crowned our labours with complete Success, demand from us in a peculiar manner the warmest returns of Gratitude & Piety to the Supreme Author of all Good.”

Washington not only commanded his soldiers to worship God, but he frequently mentioned his personal belief in God and encouraged his countrymen to be faithful and virtuous. Washington was particularly convinced that God had intervened on America’s behalf during the War for Independence, as were most Americans at the time. One time he affirmed:

“The man must be bad indeed who can look upon the events of the American Revolution without feeling the warmest gratitude towards the great Author of the Universe whose divine interposition was so frequently manifested in our behalf—And it is my earnest prayer that we may so conduct ourselves as to merit a continuance of those blessings with which we have hitherto been favoured” (George Washington to Samuel Langdon, September 28, 1789).

Another time, Washington observed:

“The hand of Providence has been so conspicuous in all this, that he must be worse than an infidel that lacks faith, and more than wicked, that has not gratitude enough to acknowledge his obligations” (George Washington to Thomas Nelson, August 20, 1778).

In his First Inaugural Address as president, Washington was moved to comment that Americans were “bound to acknowledge” God’s hand in their Revolution:

“[I]t would be peculiarly improper to omit in this first official Act, my fervent supplications to that Almighty Being who rules over the Universe, who presides in the Councils of Nations, and whose providential aids can supply every human defect, that his benediction may consecrate to the liberties and happiness of the People of the United States, a Government instituted by themselves for these essential purposes: and may enable every instrument employed in its administration to execute with success, the functions allotted to his charge. In tendering this homage to the Great Author of every public and private good I assure myself that it expresses your sentiments not less than my own; nor those of my fellow-citizens at large, less than either. No People can be bound to acknowledge and adore the invisible hand, which conducts the Affairs of men more than the People of the United States. Every step, by which they have advanced to the character of an independent nation, seems to have been distinguished by some token of providential agency.”

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To Washington, God was the real Founder of America and of her inspired Constitution. During his immortal Farewell Address, President Washington made it clear that his convictions had not changed. He spoke a truth that is as applicable today as it was in 1796:

“Of all the dispositions and habits which lead to political prosperity, religion and morality are indispensable supports. In vain would that man claim the tribute of patriotism, who should labor to subvert these great pillars of human happiness, these firmest props of the duties of men and citizens. The mere politician, equally with the pious man, ought to respect and to cherish them. A volume could not trace all their connections with private and public felicity. Let it simply be asked: Where is the security for property, for reputation, for life, if the sense of religious obligation desert the oaths which are the instruments of investigation in courts of justice? And let us with caution indulge the supposition that morality can be maintained without religion. Whatever may be conceded to the influence of refined education on minds of peculiar structure, reason and experience both forbid us to expect that national morality can prevail in exclusion of religious principle.

“It is substantially true that virtue or morality is a necessary spring of popular government. The rule, indeed, extends with more or less force to every species of free government. Who that is a sincere friend to it can look with indifference upon attempts to shake the foundation of the fabric?”

In harmony with his public sentiments, President Washington wrote a letter to Protestant clergy wherein he asserted: “Religion and morality are the essential pillars of civil society” (George Washington to the Protestant Clergy of Philadelphia, March 3, 1797).

For his own part, Washington never failed to acknowledge the hand of the Lord. He noted:

“No Man has a more perfect Reliance on the all-wise, and powerful dispensations of the Supreme Being than I have nor thinks his aid more necessary” (George Washington to William Gordon, May 13, 1776).

By all accounts, General Washington was supernaturally protected in both the French and Indian War and the American Revolution. Washington, and others, ascribed his protection to God. After a particularly harrowing battle during the French and Indian War, Washington observed:

“But by the all-powerful dispensations of Providence, I have been protected beyond all human probability or expectation; for I had four bullets through my coat, and two horses shot under me, yet escaped unhurt, although death was leveling my companions on every side of me” (George Washington to John A. Washington, July 18, 1755).

The Indians involved in the same battle noted that Washington seemed to be under the protection of God and could not be killed. One Indian chief recounted the following to General Washington:

“I called to my young men and said, mark yon tall and daring warrior? He is of the red-coat tribe – he hath an Indian’s wisdom, and his warriors fight as we do – himself alone exposed.

“Quick, let your aim be certain, and he dies. Our rifles were leveled, rifles which, but for you, knew not how to miss – ‘twas all in vain, a power mightier than we, shielded you.

“Seeing you were under the special guardianship of the Great Spirit, we immediately ceased to fire at you . . . there is something bids me speak in the voice of prophecy: Listen! The Great Spirit protects that man, and guides his destinies – he will become the chief of nations, and a people yet unborn will hail him as the founder of a mighty empire. I am come to pay homage to the man who is the particular favorite of Heaven, and who can never die in battle” (Bob Gingrich, Founding Fathers vs. History Revisionists, 29-30).

Washington did not utter idle words. As the quotations thus far demonstrate conclusively, Washington was a man who said what he meant and did what he said he would do. He wasn’t afraid to put himself in harm’s way for his beliefs or risk his life for his country. Thus, when Washington said he believed in God, he meant it and did all he could to show his devotion.

As frequently as his demanding public service allowed, George Washington attended Christian worship services. In fact, Washington donated money for the construction of Christ Church near his home. He also attended Pohick Church in which, according to numerous sources, Washington served as a vestryman for some twenty years. Washington also kept a prayer journal and had a personal copy of the Bible which he routinely read and which was donated to Christ Church after his death. It is beyond dispute that George Washington was a Christian who actively practiced his faith.

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In addition to upholding Christian values, Washington lived by a strict personal code of conduct. He wrote up this code into 110 “Rules of Civility and Decent Behavior in Company and Conversation.” Numbers 108 and 110 are the most relevant and give us a peek into Washington’s outlook on life: “When you speak of God or his attributes, let it be seriously & with reverence.” And, finally: “Labor to keep alive in your breast that little spark of celestial fire called conscience.”

From all credible accounts and eyewitness statements, we can conclude that Washington was a good, honest, upright man. He was a Christian with a high sense of honor and integrity. He was sometimes brutally honest. He was calculated and exercise wise judgement. He was a man of boldness and bravery. He was a supreme patriot who gave his life to the cause of Liberty.

One final aspect of Washington’s influence will be discussed. More than almost any other Founding Father, George Washington pushed for a new federal constitution to replace the failing Articles of Confederation. Viewing the proceedings of the nation he loved and had fought so mightily for from his retirement at Mount Vernon made Washington uncomfortable. He saw that the Union must collapse unless reformed.

A few quotes show Washington’s apprehensions:

“That it is necessary to revise, and amend the articles of Confederation, I entertain no doubt . . . Yet, something must be done, or the fabrick must fall. It certainly is tottering!” (George Washington to John Jay, May 18, 1786).

“No man in the United States is or can be more deeply impressed with the necessity of a reform in our present confederation than myself. No man, perhaps, has felt the bad effects of it more sensibly; for to the defects thereof, and want of powers in Congress, may justly be ascribed the prolongation of the war and consequently the expenses occasioned by it. More than half the perplexities I have experienced in the course of my command, and almost the whole of the difficulties and distress of the army, have their origin here” (George Washington to Alexander Hamilton, March 31, 1783).

“Let us look to our National character, and to things beyond the present period. No morn ever dawned more favourably than ours did; and no day was ever more clouded than the present! Wisdom, and good examples are necessary at this time to rescue the political machine from the impending storm. Virginia has now an opportunity to set the latter, and has enough of the former, I hope, to take the lead in promoting this great and arduous work. Without some alteration in our political creed, the superstructure we have been seven years raising at the expence of so much blood and treasure, must fall. We are fast verging to anarchy and confusion!” (George Washington to James Madison, November 5, 1786).

Suffice it to say that Washington foresaw the collapse of the fledgling American government unless the constitution was immediately overhauled. Washington urged and encouraged his fellow patriots to step forward and rescue the Republic. Eventually, a convention was called and Washington was adopted as its presiding head. After months of careful deliberation, the convention produced the U.S. Constitution, a document I consider to be literally inspired by Almighty God.

George Washington approved the document and, upon signing his name to it, remarked:

“Should the states reject this excellent constitution, the probability is that an opportunity will never again offer to cancel another in peace – the next will be drawn in blood” (Allison, Parry, Skousen, The Real George Washington, 490-491).

Shortly thereafter, during the constitutional ratification process, Washington remarked:

“No one can rejoice more than I do at every step taken by the People of this great Country to preserve the Union—establish good order & government—and to render the Nation happy at home & respected abroad. No Country upon Earth ever had it more in its power to attain these blessings than United America. Wonderously strange then, & much to be regretted indeed would it be, were we to neglect the means, and to stray from the road to which the finger of Providence has so manifestly pointed. I cannot believe it will ever come to pass! The great Author of all good has not conducted us so far on the Road to happiness and glory to withdraw from us, in the hour of need, his beneficent support” (George Washington to Benjamin Lincoln, June 29, 1788).

When the Constitution was ratified, Washington became its greatest champion. Of this charter, he publicly declared: “[T]he Constitution is the guide which I never can abandon” (George Washington to Boston Selectmen, July 28, 1795). Another time he wrote: “The Constitution of the United States, and the laws made under it, must mark the line of my official conduct” (George Washington to Edmund Randolph, 1790).

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After a successful term in office, President Washington was overjoyed at the success America had seen directly because of the new Constitution. It was the American People’s mission, he believed, to show the world that constitutional republicanism is the soundest system of government ever devised:

“To complete the [A]merican character, it remains for the citizens of the United States, to shew to the world, that the reproach heretofore cast on Republican Governments for their want of stability, is without foundation, when that Government is the deliberate choice of an enlightened people: and I am fully persuaded, that every well-wisher to the happiness & prosperity of this Country, will evince by his conduct, that we live under a government of laws; and that while we preserve inviolate our national faith, we are desirous to live in amity with all mankind” (George Washington to the citizens of Alexandria, July 4, 1793).

The way in which America could show the world the wisdom of the Constitution was, simply enough, to follow it! Indeed, Washington strongly believed that all citizens owed strict obedience to the Constitution. He was most emphatic on this point. In his Farewell Address, which ought to be required reading for all Americans, he declared:

“This government, the offspring of our own choice, uninfluenced and unawed, adopted upon full investigation and mature deliberation, completely free in its principles, in the distribution of its powers, uniting security with energy, and containing within itself a provision for its own amendment, has a just claim to your confidence and your support. Respect for its authority, compliance with its laws, acquiescence in its measures, are duties enjoined by the fundamental maxims of true liberty. The basis of our political systems is the right of the people to make and to alter their constitutions of government. But the Constitution which at any time exists, till changed by an explicit and authentic act of the whole people, is sacredly obligatory upon all. The very idea of the power and the right of the people to establish government presupposes the duty of every individual to obey the established government” (George Washington, Farewell Address, 1796).

Much of our constitutional form of government, and, indeed, the U.S. Constitution itself, came about due to George Washington’s instrumentality. He used his influence to persuade his countrymen to draft a constitution which would enshrine the rule of law, protect natural rights, and limit government while empowering it to fully protect the citizens of the country. He also used his influence to urge adoption of the new Constitution. And, then, he worked hard for eight years as president to enforce and maintain that sacred document.

Yes, it was George Washington, the Father of our Country, who really popularized constitutional government in the United States. His indomitable influence and skillful leadership brought the government into being and carried it through its first eight years. He set in stone the practice of a president only serving two terms and then graciously retiring – a tradition faithfully followed until the Marxist demagogue FDR served four consecutive terms, prompting a formal change in the law. Washington was also responsible for adding the words “so help me God” to the end of his presidential oath. All eyes were on Washington in the nation’s critical moments and he guided her through the rocky waters by following the Constitution, applying his own native judgment, and following God’s laws in his personal conduct.

George Washington was, and remains, a true hero. Few heroes in fact have been as worthy of the appellation as Washington. It is, therefore, a true sign of cultural rot that many Americans are beginning to spurn and despise this incredible man. It is rare in history that a man accomplished so much good for his nation, yet, in time, became so hated. A recent and ongoing incident demonstrates this growing hostility.

In San Francisco – perhaps the epicenter of all that is wrong with America – a school recently wanted to destroy an old George Washington mural painted one of its walls. According to the school, the mural “traumatizes students” and “glorifies slavery” and “genocide.” To allegedly protect their students from the image of George Washington, the school decided to paint over the mural, but then decided to simply cover it. Heaven forbid we allow school students to learn about the Father of their Country, the Commander-in-Chief of the Revolution, and the first president of the United States!

Because of the communist cancer that has almost totally taken over public schooling, academia, Hollywood, the press, and government, our Founding Fathers are being vilified as violent “rebels,” self-serving aristocrats, bigots, racists, and religiously-motivated oppressors. Agencies within our government have even gone so far as to classify the Sons of Liberty and our Founding Fathers as “domestic terrorists,” implying that anyone who believes like they did are also “terrorists.” And now the FBI is calling “conspiracy theorists” an extremist threat.

Yes, fighting for Freedom and truth is extreme and revolutionary, especially when the government is antagonistic to Liberty. Historian Charles Beard is said to have observed: “You need only reflect that one of the best ways to get yourself a reputation as a dangerous citizen these days is to go about repeating the very phrases which our founding fathers used in the struggle for independence” (Charles A. Beard, in M. Kenneth Creamer, The Reformation of Union State Sovereignty, 265).

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This sentiment is, unfortunately, accurate. And there was no more “dangerous citizen” in American history than George Washington. He was the “rebel” leader – the point of the patriotic spear. He was formidable to tyrants and traitors, but a true friend to Liberty. He was a patriot in every sense of the term. He was then as he ought to be now “first in the hearts of his countrymen” (Richard Henry Lee, Funeral Oration on the Death of George Washington, December 28, 1799).

Washington’s shining example will always inspire sincere American patriots. His words will always buoy his countrymen. His spirit will always ride alongside those wishing to rid their country of tyranny and to defend Freedom. God help us remember and emulate George Washington, the most indispensable of indispensable men!

Zack Strong,

August 21, 2019.

Best and Worst U.S. Presidents

To commemorate Presidents Day, I have put together a top-five list of best and worst U.S. presidents. Choosing the five best presidents is quite easy inasmuch as the pool of good presidents is rather small. Selecting only five to grace my top-five worst presidents list is much harder considering the dozens of awful candidates to choose from. As I fill out my list, I will highlight the successes and failures of these men in the interest of learning from the past.

Let’s start off with the bad news first. Though it was a difficult decision, I have narrowed down my list to the worst five presidents in our nation’s history. These men have thoroughly desecrated the Constitution, which is a sacred and inspired document. They have abused and violated their solemn oath of office, thus committing treason. They have signed egregious, unconstitutional, and immoral laws and created a multitude of horrendous departments and agencies. Each of these men presided over America during a time of war – and often wars which they deliberately caused in order to further an agenda. I consider most of these men not merely bad presidents, but evil conspirators in the international conspiracy which holds mankind by the throat and threatens the overthrow of Freedom and peace in all lands. Without further ado, I present the five worst U.S. presidents and the accomplishments which won them infamy.

Worst Presidents

5. Abraham Lincoln

4. George W. Bush

3. Barack Obama

2. Woodrow Wilson

1. FDR

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Abraham Lincoln: Some folks may be surprised to see Lincoln on my list of worst presidents. After all, didn’t Abraham Lincoln free the slaves, keep the country united, and preach unity, love, and peace? Actually, no, he did not. President Lincoln’s violations of the U.S. Constitution were colossal. Most historians sweep these violations under the rug or label them “war expediency.” They were unfortunate but “necessary” war measures, they claim. Yet, the historical reality was far different from the glowing, laudatory, worshipful one painted by Lincoln’s adoring 21st Century supporters.

It must be remembered that Abraham Lincoln started the Civil War, or, perhaps more accurately, the War of Northern Aggression. After South Carolina had seceded from the Union, she demanded that Union troops be removed from Fort Sumter. Abraham Lincoln refused to acquiesce even though South Carolina warned they would attack if the troops were not peacefully removed. If you have never read the exchange of letters between Fort Sumter’s commanding officer and South Carolina’s military leaders, you ought to. They reveal that the fort’s commanders wanted to withdraw to avoid war, but stayed on Lincoln’s orders. They also reveal that the attack was not a surprise, but that South Carolina actually told the fort’s defenders when they would attack and expressed their regret in so doing.

The tragedy of war could have been avoided if Lincoln had simply removed his troops from what consisted of a foreign territory where he had no legal jurisdiction. Using the attack on the fort as a pretext, Lincoln unilaterally and illegally called up troops to form an army. It must be remembered that a president is not always commander-in-chief. He is only commander-in-chief when the Congress declares war and calls up the military. However, Lincoln apparently knew better than the Constitution and its Framers.

During the Civil War, Lincoln violated the constitutionally-protected right of habeas corpus and illegally arrested and imprisoned in veritable concentration camps tens of thousands of Northerners who did not support his illegal war. Among those arrested were judges who issued statements saying he was acting unconstitutionally and in violation of his oath and authority as president. Lincoln’s troops were also involved in voter fraud on numerous occasions and were used to bully reluctant states into tacitly supporting the war. Lincoln pardoned war criminals and presided over the unnecessary and heinous rape and plunder of the Confederacy. Lincoln’s policies were so collectivist and tyrannical that even Karl Marx loved Lincoln and wrote him congratulatory letters and declared that he was helping the world revolution.

In his personal life, Lincoln was a very troubled man. Numerous sources explain that he frequently told dirty and inappropriate jokes. Though he was anti-slavery, he was also consistently anti-emancipation and, indeed, his Emancipation Proclamation was a propaganda war measure that did not free one single slave. Lincoln’s family was deeply troubled and he is reported as having attended séances in the White House. He was not the wonderful, humble Christian man the history books claim he was.

All of that said, it is my personal opinion that President Lincoln may have had a change of heart during the middle of the war. In 1863, there was a marked changed in his tone and rhetoric. He began suddenly talking about God and religion and how this calamity was God’s judgement upon a nation that had violated His laws. This is perfectly accurate, the Civil War was a judgement of the Almighty. Some historians have discounted Lincoln’s change in tone as mere political posturing. Whether it was or was not, we cannot say because we do not know Lincoln’s heart. I hope for his sake that he did have a change of heart.

In the end, however,Abraham Lincoln’s gross, deliberate, and frequent violations of the Constitution, his initiation of a bloody war and the invasion of a sovereign country, his persecution and imprisonment of war dissenters, and the fact that he massively centralized the government and effectively destroyed the power of the States ensured in the Tenth Amendment, earn him a place on my list of worst presidents. Do not think of Lincoln as the “great emancipator,” think of him as the “great centralizer” and the “great destroyer of the Constitution.” While he might have had a change of heart and inwardly repented of his crimes and his violations of his oath of office, his evisceration of the Constitution cannot be excused or overlooked.

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George W. Bush: Without a doubt, the younger Bush was one of the worst men to ever sit in the Oval Office. Under his watch, the United States initiated the bogus War on Terror which has cost the lives of millions of people globally, including many thousands of our countrymen. Still today, twenty-four veterans commit suicide every day as a consequence of the horrors they have witnessed and were compelled to commit because of this illegal, immoral, unconstitutional, and undeclared war. These wars have done untold damage to the country, our national spirit, and our image abroad. Apart from the cost in human life and suffering, trillions of dollars have been wasted on these aggressive wars against nations who have never harmed us and do not have the capability to do so.

If you have not yet woken up to the fact that 9/11 was a false flag terror event, please educate yourself. Whether the president was aware of the plot ahead of time is debatable. But that there were conspirators in our government, and in the intelligence services of other nations, who perpetrated this event is beyond question. At any rate, President Bush used this false flag as a pretext to not only take us to war against innocent nations, but to restrict Liberty here at home. The Patriot Act was rammed through Congress in the immediate aftermath of 9/11. This act, as well as others such as the John Warner Defense Authorization Act and the Military Commissions Act, shredded the Constitution’s guarantees of the right of habeas corpus, due process, privacy, etc. Being advised by ex-Stasi (i.e. communist secret police) agents, Bush created the Department of Homeland Security. He also commissioned the unconstitutional agency known as the TSA. Through these and other agencies, President Bush presided over a mass violation of Americans’ privacy rights.

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Additionally, President Bush signed into law the communistic No Child Left Behind bill which gave the federal government even greater control over American schools and enforced mediocrity nationwide. He signed into law a massive expansion of Medicare and other socialist welfare programs. He delivered “bailouts” to numerous corporations and thus furthered the government’s socialistic grasp on the economy. And the list of “accomplishments” goes on and on and on.

Finally, President Bush, like his father, was a member of the elitist secret society known as Skull and Bones. The evidence suggests that this group is an offshoot or sub department of the Order of Illuminati founded in Bavaria in 1776. Numerous U.S. presidents have belonged to oath-bound secret societies. These societies rule our nation and world and are increasing their power and control with each passing year. With puppets like George W. Bush in the White House, their control deepens and our Republic suffers.

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Barack Obama: President Obama’s legacy of corruption is fresh in everyone’s mind, so I won’t spend much time on it. Suffice it to say that Obama was an out-and-out communist who was mentored by the rabid communist Frank Marshall Davis, groomed by communist advisors such as the felon and terrorist Bill Ayers who belonged to the communist Weather Underground, and surrounded with conspirators like Zionist Rahm Israel Emanuel. He was groomed for the presidency by communistic elements. His rapid rise, despite his lack of credentials, experience, and funds, is incredibly telling. He kow-towed to the communist conspiracy and worked hard for eight years to further the Marxist agenda and continued subverting American culture and law.

In complete repudiation of his campaign promises, President Obama continued, and in some respects intensified, Bush’s immoral War on Terror. Obama’s drone strikes killed thousands of innocent people throughout the Middle East. Under Obama’s stewardship, the U.S. military attacked numerous countries including Libya, Yemen, and Syria. The current crisis in Syria hit its stride during Obama’s presidency.

Additionally, the economy tanked during Obama’s terms. Unemployment rates skyrocketed despite the government’s manipulation of the numbers to conceal the problem. Our debt rose dramatically and, in fact, doubled the previous debt of all past administrations combined. Inflation and taxation increased during his terms. Per communist ideology, wealth redistribution to both domestic and foreign sources went into overdrive. And, lastly, Obamacare expanded socialistic control over every aspect of Americans’ lives, while simultaneously increasing rates across the board.

President Obama’s administration was a total disaster. By the end of his terms, the country was more divided than ever, the economy had been wrecked, the federal government’s powers had been increased, spying was even more rampant than under Bush, our War on Terror had increased while our military’s high tech weaponry was simultaneously gutted, and communists became emboldened enough to show themselves publicly. For all of these reasons, and hundreds more that I do not have space to record, Obama ranks third on my list of worst presidents.

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Woodrow Wilson: President Woodrow Wilson’s administration was a landmark turning point in U.S. history – and not for the better. President Wilson presided over the fundamental restructuring of the American economic system. Wilson signed into law the Federal Reserve Act which wrenched the control of America’s currency from the government and lodged it in the hands of a private entity known as the Federal Reserve. Contrary to myth, the Federal Reserve is not federal – that is, it is not a government agency. It is a system of privately-owned banks. Some of the shareholders in these bankers are foreigners. As the Federal Reserve chairmen have openly stated, the Federal Reserve is not accountable to the U.S. government. In other words, in direct violation of the Constitution which gives Congress the control over the coining of our currency, that power has been given to an unaccountable, privately-owned group of elitists who print money on a whim and who raise and lower our rates of interest and inflation at their leisure. If America is ever to recover her status as an independent Republic, she must cut out this Federal Reserve cancer immediately.

Additionally, Woodrow Wilson fought against the Constitution when he went along with the passage of 16th and 17th Amendments. The 16th introduced the graduated income tax in direct violation of the Constitution’s plain provisions governing equal taxation, and the 17th changed the ingenious constitutional method for electing senators, thus dramatically lessening the power of the states.

In direct violation of his campaign promises, Wilson’s henchmen secretly negotiated with Britain and various international entities to bring the United States into World War I – a war in which we had no legitimate interest. Once reelected for a second term, the administration put the wheels into motion and sent our boys to die in France in a pointless struggle. The pretext used was the sinking of the Lusitania, a passenger ship illegally carrying munitions to Britain in violation of the rules of neutrality. The British deliberately steered the ship into hostile waters and sacrificed it in order to draw America into her war.

During the war, Wilson unjustly rounded up and imprisoned tens of thousands of political prisoners and assaulted the right of free speech under the Sedition and Espionage Acts. Then, after the war, Wilson was instrumental in pushing for the League of Nations – an early version of the United Nations and an attempt to create a one-world government. Fortunately, the effort failed at that time. But the damage had been done – America began to become a warlike people which engaged itself in the petty conflicts of Europe.

From subverting our entire economic system by aiding in the establishment of the Federal Reserve monstrosity, to taking us to war while pretending to be a paragon of peace, to altering the Constitution’s plain provisions regarding elections, state authority, and taxation, Wilson was a horrendous president who did more damage to the nation than almost any other man who has ever lived in it. Additionally, it is worthy of note that Wilson was a Fabian Socialist. He was America’s first openly socialistic president, though of course he used a different and misleading label. But call it what you will, Wilson promoted the Fabian Socialist cause. And students of history will know that Fabian Socialism was merely a wing of the greater communist conspiracy.

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FDR: FDR’s presidency shall live in infamy. FDR tops my list of worst presidents because he gave America four terms of straight communism at home and unbridled interventionism abroad. He fundamentally altered the American way of life perhaps more than any other president, though Woodrow Wilson’s acquiescence to the establishment of the Federal Reserve and the whims of international bankers places him in a close second place. During FDR’s terms, the government bureaucracy ballooned. Its ranks became infested with communists and Zionists. By the end of FDR’s fourth term, the United States had been converted from a relatively non-interventionist nation to a warlike, aggressive, international empire ruled by a power-hungry, communist-infiltrated regime.

Though he nurtured the image of a grandfatherly figure in a wheelchair, FDR was in actuality a conniving conman and mass murderer who was beholden to Wall Street and the international bankers. FDR loved the Soviet Union and was good friends with the communist tyrant Joseph Stalin, whom he affectionately called Uncle Joe Stalin. FDR’s regime became the first major nation to diplomatically recognize the failing Soviet Union and establish ties with it. This recognition allowed Western aid and capital to pour into the USSR, thus saving it from its severe deterioration. Stalin returned the favor by sending his spies and agents to infiltrate FDR’s government, and using the aid to build up his war machine.

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Entire books have been written about the staggering number of communists who infested FDR’s regime and served as his personal advisors and policy makers. One of the most infamous was Alger Hiss, a Soviet spy who served as an aid to FDR and later became the first secretary-general of the communist-controlled United Nations. During 1941 when the Germans were on the verge of destroying the evil empire once and for all, FDR intervened and sent billions of dollars of aid, and thousands of trucks and tanks and other badly needed supplies to the Soviet Union under the Lend-Lease program. Without this aid, it is possible that Germany – the most anti-communist nation on earth at the time – would have won the war in the East and eliminated the communist virus. Indeed, so evil and cruel was the Soviet Union that many Russian subjects hailed the Germans as liberators and many joined her armies to fight against their own Red Army. However, America intervened and saved the Soviet Union – the evilest and most murderous regime in world history – and tipped the balance of history in the communists’ favor.

World War II was started by the Allies. You won’t read that in mainstream history books or see it on the History Channel, but it is true. I devote a chapter in my book A Century of Red to explaining the true origin of that deadly conflagration. Hitler simply did not start the war. You have been lied to. But more relevant to our discussion is how the United States entered the war.

Prior to 1941, FDR had tried desperately to get into the war in Europe. He goaded the Germans, attacked German ships, illegally sent supplies to Britain and the USSR, etc. Yet, Germany did not take the bait. Consequently, FDR changed tactics and decided to enter the war by goading Japan into attacking us. To do this, FDR pressured Asian governments to stop selling supplies to Japan. The United States also placed embargoes on Japanese materials. Slowly, following an 8-point plan, the United States strangled the Japanese economy. Japan, in retaliation for what constituted acts of war according to international law, decided to strike the American Pacific Fleet based at Pearl Harbor.

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As the war preparations developed, FDR kept tabs on them in almost real time. Unbeknownst to most people is the fact that the United States and Britain had broken the Japanese secret codes. Not only did we crack their diplomatic codes, but we deciphered their military codes as well. Only a handful of individuals, including FDR, had access to these reports. Consequently, when Japan’s fleet sailed to Hawaii to attack Pearl Harbor, FDR could literally track their movements across the Pacific. He knew they were going to strike but deliberately and intentionally withheld this information from his commanders at Pearl Harbor. FDR wanted war and he was prepared to sacrifice almost 3,000 American lives to do so.

As he rose in Congress the day after the attack to demand a declaration of war, FDR lied to the world when he said that Japan’s attack was a surprise. The only “infamy” of that day rested on his very own shoulders. FDR has American blood on his hands. And, through his maneuvering and duplicity in getting the United States into war, he has the blood of millions of German and Japanese civilians on his hands, too. From the firebombing of more than 60 Japanese cities to the horrific terror bombings of Germany and mainland Europe, FDR committed gross war crimes and presided over some of the worst atrocities in world history. And at Yalta, FDR surrendered Europe to the communists, thus sealing the fate of tens of millions of innocent people.

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In addition to these crimes, FDR took America off the gold standard and confiscated Americans’ gold, instituted numerous socialistic programs including the disastrous New Deal, tampered with the judicial system, and repeatedly violated the Constitution. FDR signed more executive orders than any other president. He ruled as a dictator, rounded up Japanese-Americans and threw them into concentration camps, deliberately took us into the bloodiest war in history, saved the Soviet Union from defeat, presided over the dastardly terror bombings of millions of innocent people, inaugurated the construction of the atom bomb, brought more communist and Zionist operatives into the government than any other president, bowed to his masters on Wall Street, lied through his teeth to the American People, and rode roughshod over the U.S. Constitution and international law.

FDR was, without a doubt, the worst president in our history. Save for FDR, the communist conspiracy which menaces the world may have died out or at least been severely diminished. Save for FDR, the United States would not have been involved in the Second World War. Save for FDR, America might have remained on the gold standard. Save for FDR’s socialist policies, the Great Depression would have ended far sooner. I can think of nothing FDR ever did in his 12-year reign that benefited the United States. He was a lying degenerate and war criminal whose name and legacy should live “in infamy.”

Honorable mention:

Teddy Roosevelt. As an outright socialist (or, as he called himself, a “progressive”) Roosevelt greatly shifted the government from a republican one to a socialistic one, and thus deserves an honorable mention on my worsts presidents list.

 

The list of good presidents is very short. Those who made the list are so well known that I have decided to only provide short lists of their numerous accomplishments. I urge every American to study these men and their principles and policies. They were patriots and constitutionalists. They were Christians with high moral character. They hated war, fought the international bankers, slashed governmental spending, and were apostles of Liberty who tried hard to protect individual rights and traditional values. I now present the five best American presidents.

Best Presidents

5. James Monroe

4. Andrew Jackson

3. James Madison

2. George Washington

1. Thomas Jefferson

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James Monroe: President Monroe was one of the last Founding Fathers to become president. He was a faithful Christian and an upright man. He famously established the Monroe Doctrine to protect the United States and the Americas from foreign tyranny. This wise, Heaven-inspired policy was not interventionism, as some have assumed, but a legitimate defensive posture to protect this special (and once free) land of America. Behind the scenes, Thomas Jefferson was influential in encouraging President Monroe to institute this policy.

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Andrew Jackson: The Establishment historians hate President Jackson. Such hate coming from controlled Establishment sources piqued my interest some years ago and I started investigating Jackson’s presidency. All the public knows about Jackson’s legacy is the Trail of Tears, the Indian Removal Act, and how “Old Hickory” was a cantankerous and bitter man. What we are not told is that Andrew Jackson was one of the most qualified men to ever become president. We don’t hear that he fought against the vile bankers and singlehandedly saved America from becoming a fiefdom to them. We are never told that Jackson wholeheartedly supported the Constitution and rule of law. We are not told that President Jackson was the only president to ever pay off 100% of the national debt. We are not told that the economy boomed during the Jacksonian era. And we are certainly never informed that Jackson fought corruption within the government itself. These wonderful achievements are covered up and instead we only hear that Andrew Jackson was an “Indian-killer,” a “racist,” a “tyrant,” and other such ludicrous labels.

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James Madison: Clearly one of the most brilliant men ever to hold office, James Madison ranks third on my list. Other than winning the War of 1812 against the British invaders, James Madison’s terms were fairly uneventful. For that, I thank President Madison. A president is not meant to “get in there and change things.” A president is meant to quietly preside over the executive branch, ensure that each citizen is protected in his rights, and, otherwise, to butt out of the nation’s affairs. His benign policies led America into a period of peace and prosperity known as the “Era of Good Feelings.” Beyond this, Madison was one of the most upright and moral men to hold high office in this country. He was the Father of the Constitution, the author of the Bill of Rights, understood what Liberty truly is, and spent his life protecting our God-given rights and serving his country faithfully. If we had more men like James Madison today, I would not fear for our Republic’s future.

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George Washington: The Father of our Country was one of the greatest figures in all of recorded human history. Though the Establishment history books denigrate this amazing man as a slaveholder, an aristocrat, and a self-serving politicians, this is total hokum. General George Washington was an incredibly devout Christian who fasted and prayed and enforced high moral conduct among his soldiers. Few statesmen in our history have spoken more about God and our obligation to be a moral People. In his famous Farewell Address, President Washington said:

“Of all the dispositions and habits which lead to political prosperity, religion and morality are indispensable supports. In vain would that man claim the tribute of patriotism, who should labor to subvert these great pillars of human happiness, these firmest props of the duties of men and citizens. The mere politician, equally with the pious man, ought to respect and to cherish them. A volume could not trace all their connections with private and public felicity. Let it simply be asked: Where is the security for property, for reputation, for life, if the sense of religious obligation desert the oaths which are the instruments of investigation in courts of justice ? And let us with caution indulge the supposition that morality can be maintained without religion. Whatever may be conceded to the influence of refined education on minds of peculiar structure, reason and experience both forbid us to expect that national morality can prevail in exclusion of religious principle.

“It is substantially true that virtue or morality is a necessary spring of popular government. The rule, indeed, extends with more or less force to every species of free government. Who that is a sincere friend to it can look with indifference upon attempts to shake the foundation of the fabric?”

George Washington by Tim Davis

George Washington was a true friend to America and to human Freedom. I revere and honor his name. He was the indispensable man in the War for Independence. And he was utterly indispensable in the establishment of our inspired Constitution with its glorious protections of our God-given rights. Without George Washington, there may have been no Union. With only a few exceptions, Washington’s Administration was emphatically faithful to the Constitution and to the promotion of American Liberty.

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Thomas Jefferson: The Sage of Monticello graces my #1 spot for best U.S. president. I love Jefferson and often call myself a Jeffersonian Constitutionalist. I believe Jefferson was the most brilliant statesman who has ever lived. His writings thrill me. His depth of wisdom astounds me. While I have a couple minor disagreements with his views, I find that his views are closer to my own on political principles than any other person I have ever met or read about.

Like Washington, Jefferson was indispensable to the birth and formation of this nation. No man was as well versed in republicanism and the principles of good government as was Jefferson. This knowledge prepared him to write the Declaration of Independence, and to pronounce that our rights are God-given and that the People hold power over their government. Historians have attempted to discredit his political work by spreading the lie that he had affairs with his slaves. This has been so thoroughly disproved and debunked that I seriously question the honesty of any so-called expert who repeats it. Thomas Jefferson was, contrary to propaganda, a Christian who loved the Bible and cherished the teachings of Jesus. He was not a deist. In fact, none of the Founding Fathers were deists; they were true Christians.

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Jefferson’s presidency was, in my opinion, the best in our history. President Jefferson protected individual rights, pardoned those who had been wrongly convicted under the Alien and Sedition Acts, established good relations with the American Indians, delayed war with England, slashed the national debt in half, lived off his own money as president, made the government more accessible to the common man, and educated the People in the principles of good government. He was a statesman in every good sense of the word. I love Thomas Jefferson!

I end this section with a quote from Jefferson’s prolific and inspired pen. Writing from Europe, he exclaimed: “[M]y god! how little do my countrymen know what precious blessings they are in possession of, and which no other people on earth enjoy” (Thomas Jefferson to James Monroe, June 17, 1785).

Honorable mentions:

John Adams. The only reason John Adams does not make my best presidents list is because he signed the Alien and Sedition Acts. Otherwise, my soul loves John Adams and his utter devotion to America and to the cause of Independence from monarchical tyranny.

John Quincy Adams: He followed in his father’s footsteps and was an honorable man of high moral conduct. He also fought the scourge of Freemasonry.

The first seven presidents of the United States were the best seven, without any question in my mind. However, beginning with the eighth president and despot Martin Van Buren, I can scarcely find a decent man who has sat in the Oval Office. It is a black mark on the American People that they have voted, decade after decade, for many generations, for scurrilous, self-serving men who have belonged to secret societies and who have worked tirelessly to subvert our God-inspired Constitution and the Freedom our Lord has bestowed upon us.

We have rejected God and He has taken away our wise judges and left us with men who mirror our own natures. If we repent of our indifference, our apathy, our ignorance, and our infidelity to the principles of the Constitution, the Lord “will restore [our] judges as at the first, and [our] counsellors as at the beginning” (Isaiah 1:26). If we do not follow this course, we will continue to have despots and immoral men to rule over us, and what is left of our precious Liberty will continue to diminish. If we do not resurrect common sense, constitutionalism, and God’s laws, our fate is sealed. I leave you to ponder the prophetic words of patriot John Adams. He warned:

“The only foundation of a free Constitution, is pure Virtue, and if this cannot be inspired into our People, in a greater Measure, than they have it now, They may change their Rulers, and the forms of Government, but they will not obtain a lasting Liberty.—They will only exchange Tyrants and Tyrannies.”

– John Adams to Zabdiel Adams, June 21, 1776.

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Zack Strong

February 19, 2018.