Rebellion to Tyrants – The American Tradition

During the War for Independence, the British oppressors called the American patriots “rebels.” George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, Samuel Adams, James Madison, Patrick Henry, Benjamin Franklin – these eminent men were “rebels.” Just what does “rebel” mean? The handy website etymonline.com tells us that the term “rebel” comes “directly from Latin rebellis “insurgent, rebellious,” from rebellare “to rebel, revolt,” from re– “opposite, against,” or perhaps “again” (see re-) + bellare “wage war,” from bellum “war”.” 

A U.S. battle flag during the War for Independence

Drawing from Webster’s 1828 dictionary, we further learn that a “rebel” is:  

“One who revolts from the government to which he owes allegiance, either by openly renouncing the authority of that government, or by taking arms and openly opposing it.” 

And the act of rebelling means: 

“To revolt; to renounce the authority of the laws and government to which one owes allegiance. Subjects may rebel by an open renunciation of the authority of the government, without taking arms; but ordinarily, rebellion is accompanied by resistance in arms.” 

To rebel, then, is to make war against one’s own government or to renounce its authority. Usually, a rebellion requires the “rebels” to take up arms and extricate themselves from their government by force. Using these definitions, our Founding Fathers absolutely were “rebels” because they took up their rifles and made war against British tyranny. In so doing, these patriots won Liberty for America and helped establish the greatest nation in human history. 

Would any true American be so foolish as to suggest that the American Founding Fathers were villains for taking up arms and freeing our People from British oppression? Would any dyed-in-the-wool American be so treasonous as to say that the American Rebellion was wrong, that it was evil, or that it was not clearly justified beyond any reasonable doubt? 

There has never been a more just and holier war than the American Revolution – that great armed rebellion we celebrate every Independence Day. Don’t shy away from the term “rebellion.” It was a rebellion. Society has become indoctrinated to think of any act of rebellion as bad, wrong, or unjustified. We’ve been conditioned to see everyone labeled an “insurgent” or “rebel” as unpatriotic or a traitor. This is simply preposterous. 

The biggest rebels in U.S. history are also our biggest national heroes – the Founding Fathers, the Sons of Liberty, and their fellow Freedom Fighters. But they’d be a mere footnote in history had they not rebelled. If Thomas Jefferson hadn’t written the Declaration of Independence, would you even know he had existed? If George Washington hadn’t led a rag-tag team of militiamen and soldiers against his government’s professional army, would he be a household name today? Let’s be honest – the only reason our Founding Fathers are known, beloved, and venerated today is because they had the courage to rebel against their oppressive, corrupt, unworthy government. 

Thomas Jefferson’s personal seal

The personal motto of both Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson, was “Rebellion to Tyrants is Obedience to God.” Thomas Jefferson designed a striking seal to display this powerful phrase. The duo even proposed that the maxim become the national motto. Separate and apart from Franklin and Jefferson, “Rebellion to Tyrants is Obedience to God” was a common thought at the time. Pastors taught that it was man’s duty to defend his God-given rights even if it meant taking up arms. Local militias stood up against the military when the latter came to town demanding: “Lay down your arms, you damned rebels, and disperse.” Americans high and low understood that servitude is Satanic and Liberty is godly. 

Armed with this knowledge and with a sense of duty towards their Faith, Families, and Freedom, thousands of patriots felt no qualms about taking up arms and rebelling. Sometimes we seem to imagine that these early Americans had their own country and were simply defending themselves against the British. Instead, we should remember that the King of England and British Parliament were the government. Knowing this makes our forefathers’ rebellion all the more impressive and consequential. It gave us the example that rebellion against government is not only allowed, but noble and right in the correct circumstances. 

The Declaration of Independence makes this abundantly clear. In words that should echo in our ears, Jefferson wrote and the Continental Congress ratified: 

“We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.–That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, –That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness. Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shewn, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security.” 

Read that again if you must, but let it sink in. Rebellion for rebellion’s sake is not advisable or desirable. However, when government perpetrates “a long train of abuses and usurpations,” and when government’s course is one of tyranny and centralization of power, it is not only just and good to rebel, but it is a solemn “duty” to “throw off such Government.” To reiterate, “it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish” their government whenever government fails to protect the rights of the People. 

The current oath of office sworn by members of Congress reads: 

“I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which I am about to enter: So help me God.” 

This oath has been amended slightly over the years, but what has changed but little is the first crucial line: “I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support the Constitution of the United States.” The president swears the same. This is the key! If we want to know whether our elected representatives are faithful or whether they are traitors, we need simply observe and consider whether they support and defend the Constitution. If they do, then rebellion is off the table, inappropriate, and destructive. If they don’t uphold and obey the Constitution, and the normal recourse of elections and trials can’t remedy the situation, then rebellion is not only justified, but a sacred duty! 

Thomas Jefferson often wrote of the necessity of rebellion: 

“I hold it that a little rebellion now and then is a good thing, and as necessary in the political world as storms in the physical. Unsuccesful rebellions indeed generally establish the incroachments on the rights of the people which have produced them. An observation of this truth should render honest republican governors so mild in their punishment of rebellions, as not to discourage them too much. It is a medecine necessary for the sound health of government” (Thomas Jefferson to James Madison, January 30, 1787). 

More famously, after Shay’s Rebellion, Jefferson exclaimed: 

“God forbid we should ever be 20. years without such a rebellion. The people can not be all, and always, well informed. The part which is wrong will be discontented in proportion to the importance of the facts they misconceive. If they remain quiet under such misconceptions it is a lethargy, the forerunner of death to the public liberty. We have had 13. states independant 11. years. There has been one rebellion. That comes to one rebellion in a century and a half for each state. What country before ever existed a century and half without a rebellion? And what country can preserve it’s liberties if their rulers are not warned from time to time that their people preserve the spirit of resistance? Let them take arms. The remedy is to set them right as to facts, pardon and pacify them. What signify a few lives lost in a century or two? The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants. It is it’s natural manure” (Thomas Jefferson to William Stephens Smith, November 13, 1787). 

Compare these enlightened sentiments with those of the current regime and media talking heads who refer to the American patriots who rallied at the Capitol Building on January 6 as “domestic terrorists” and “insurrectionists.” They were nothing of the sort and to say so is dishonest, divisive, and deeply asinine. 

Let me express a feeling I had on January 6. When I saw the minor breach at the Capitol (allowed and encouraged by police in order to frame conservative America) on January 6, I was ecstatic. I thought, maybe, just maybe, the American People were waking up and were finally prepared to stand up for their rights. Instead, it turned out, that the People were content to wave flags and talk the talk, but not actually walk to the walk and force their tyrannical overlords in Washington to fulfill their oaths to the Constitution. 

So many otherwise decent people on our side almost boast that we aren’t the ones who rebel. My question is – why not? Why no revolution? Why no rebellion? Have we lost our courage? Have we lost our sense? Have we lost the spirit of Liberty that animated our forefathers to rebel against their corrupt government? The crimes committed by our government today and over the past hundred plus years dwarf in scale and savagery anything committed by the British against early Americans. The comparison isn’t even close. Yet, we’re too afraid to do our duty and alter or abolish the usurpers who tyrannize us. We’re afraid to be revolutionary. 

Many people think, contrary to what their forefathers believed in 1776, that rebellion is “unbecoming” and that we owe blind obedience to government no matter what. Christians twist Romans 13, for instance, to support the unsupportable idea that all governments get their authority from God and that every act of government is legitimate. Many people of my own faith also misquote a canonical statement saying that “sedition and rebellion are unbecoming every citizen.” If they were honest, they’d read the entire context and find that the statement falls in line with the spirit of the Declaration of Independence. It notes: 

“We believe that all men are bound to sustain and uphold the respective governments in which they reside, while protected in their inherent and inalienable rights by the laws of such governments; and that sedition and rebellion are unbecoming every citizen thus protected, and should be punished accordingly; and that all governments have a right to enact such laws as in their own judgments are best calculated to secure the public interest; at the same time, however, holding sacred the freedom of conscience” (The Doctrine and Covenants 134:5). 

Did you catch that? My Church believes, and so do I, that rebellion is wrong in times when everyone enjoys their rights and has proper recourse under the law. However, when “inherent and inalienable rights” are not protected, all bets are off. Only those duly protected by law are prohibited from rebelling; and those not “thus protected” actually have a duty to rebel. 

In his momentous Farewell Address, President George Washington stated: 

“This government, the offspring of our own choice, uninfluenced and unawed, adopted upon full investigation and mature deliberation, completely free in its principles, in the distribution of its powers, uniting security with energy, and containing within itself a provision for its own amendment, has a just claim to your confidence and your support. Respect for its authority, compliance with its laws, acquiescence in its measures, are duties enjoined by the fundamental maxims of true liberty. The basis of our political systems is the right of the people to make and to alter their constitutions of government. But the Constitution which at any time exists, till changed by an explicit and authentic act of the whole people, is sacredly obligatory upon all. The very idea of the power and the right of the people to establish government presupposes the duty of every individual to obey the established government.” 

Recall that this comes from the man who led the Rebellion against his government in 1776! General Washington knew full well that rebellion was proper and just on certain occasions. On July 2, 1776, this great man who was a defender of duly-constituted government and rule of law, issued this order to his troops: 

“The time is now near at hand which must probably determine, whether Americans are to be, Freemen, or Slaves; whether they are to have any property they can call their own; whether their Houses, and Farms, are to be pillaged and destroyed, and they consigned to a State of Wretchedness from which no human efforts will probably deliver them. The fate of unborn Millions will now depend, under God, on the Courage and Conduct of this army—Our cruel and unrelenting Enemy leaves us no choice but a brave resistance, or the most abject submission; this is all we can expect—We have therefore to resolve to conquer or die: Our own Country’s Honor, all call upon us for a vigorous and manly exertion, and if we now shamefully fail, we shall become infamous to the whole world—Let us therefore rely upon the goodness of the Cause, and the aid of the supreme Being, in whose hands Victory is, to animate and encourage us to great and noble Actions—The Eyes of all our Countrymen are now upon us, and we shall have their blessings, and praises, if happily we are the instruments of saving them from the Tyranny meditated against them. Let us therefore animate and encourage each other, and shew the whole world, that a Freeman contending for Liberty on his own ground is superior to any slavish mercenary on earth.” 

To General Washington, there was “no choice” but to rebel against the tyrannical government and carve out Freedom by force. No one fought harder for Liberty than Washington. No one was a bigger “rebel” than the Father of our Country. 

Ultimately, the sunshine patriots aren’t the ones who will decide the matter. Rather, it will be the seasoned soldiers of sanity who will step forward to secure their sacred rights. Samuel Adams warned: “If ever the Time should come, when vain & aspiring Men shall possess the highest Seats in Government, our Country will stand in Need of its experienced Patriots to prevent its Ruin” (Samuel Adams to James Warren, October 24, 1780). 

Are you one of those “experienced patriots” who will step forward? If you’re not prepared to step forward and be counted at this crucial juncture, stop calling yourself a patriot. If you’re not prepared to act – to rebel if need be – you’re not a patriot; you’re a coward and a traitor. If you’re too scared to rebel in any way necessary against one of the most wicked cabals ever to oppress a free nation, then Samuel Adams was speaking directly to you when he exclaimed: 

“Contemplate the mangled bodies of your countrymen, and then say, What should be the reward of such sacrifices? Bid us and our posterity bow the knee, supplicate the friendship, and plow, and sow, and reap, to glut the avarice of the men who have let loose on us the dogs of war to riot in our blood and hunt us from the face of the earth? If ye love wealth better than liberty, the tranquillity of servitude than the animating contest of freedom—go from us in peace. We ask not your counsels or arms. Crouch down and lick the hands which feed you. May your chains sit lightly upon you, and may posterity forget that ye were our countrymen!” (Samuel Adams, Speech, August 1, 1776). 

In 1776, our forefathers declared Independence and rebelled against their vile government. They fought for Freedom. They secured it at the price of blood and treasure. They then wisely safeguarded it by establishing the rule of law via a written Constitution. 

Today, we don’t need Independence; we have it on paper, legally, and by right. What we don’t have is a government that honors its commitments, fulfills its oaths, and protects our legitimate, God-given agency. Instead, we have a criminal clique that has hijacked our government and retains its illicit power through mass media manipulation and outright election fraud. They are the occupiers. They are the usurpers. They are the ones who owe allegiance to us. This clique has ruled for decades from the shadows, but now it openly flaunts its lordship over us and dares us to do something about it. 

No, we don’t need Independence from these banker-backed, Marxist-minded, internationalist occupiers; what we need is to oust them from power over us. When a robber breaks into your house, you don’t concede defeat and leave to find a new place to live. Instead, you fight back and reclaim what’s yours. Dear American, what’s yours? What is your birthright? Is Freedom your heritage? Isn’t a republican, representative government of limited scale promised to you in Article IV, Section 4 of the Constitution? 

Earlier, you read the oath that our elected representatives in Congress swear. Are they fulfilling that oath? Are they safeguarding the Constitution like they swore to do? Of course not! They’re perpetual liars who trample the Constitution at every turn. And this goes for Republicans as well Democrats. From Mitt Romney to Nancy Pelosi and from Chuck Schumer to Mitch McConnell, the Congress is infested with traitors and oath-breakers, conmen and enemy abettors. 

The Constitution is not defunct or broken; the men who conduct our national affairs are corrupt and treasonous. As one colorful figure of the nineteenth century stated: “I love the government and the constitution of the United States, but I do not love the damned rascals who administer the government.” Again, I repeat, that our constitutional system is not at fault – the fault lies with the men who break their oaths and the apathetic citizenry which allows them to get away with it. 

What we need is to revive the Constitution. We need a Constitution Revolution. We need a rebellion against the tyrants who have usurped power over us. We need invoke our natural rights and wage war against traitors in the spirit of 1776. The traitors are easy to identify. Look at who promotes free will and constitutional protections on individual Liberty and who proposes policies that restrict free will and suggest coercion and you’ll know which side to stand on. 

I call for a Constitution Revolution. We need a revolution in our minds and hearts. We need to revolutionize our understanding of the Constitution. Founding Father James Wilson said

“Were I called upon for my reasons why I deem so highly of the American character, I would assign them in a very few words—That character has been eminently distinguished by the love of liberty, and the love of law. . . . 

“But law and liberty cannot rationally become the objects of our love, unless they first become the objects of our knowledge. The same course of study, properly directed, will lead us to the knowledge of both. Indeed, neither of them can be known, because neither of them can exist, without the other. Without liberty, law loses its nature and its name, and becomes oppression. Without law, liberty also loses its nature and its name, and becomes licentiousness. In denominating, therefore, that science, by which the knowledge of both is acquired, it is unnecessary to preserve, in terms, the distinction between them. That science may be named, as it has been named, the science of law. 

“The science of law should, in some measure, and in some degree, be the study of every free citizen, and of every free man. Every free citizen and every free man has duties to perform and rights to claim. Unless, in some measure, and in some degree, he knows those duties and those rights, he can never act a just and an independent part.” 

To restate Wilson’s words, you can’t be an effective patriot if you don’t know our nation’s charter of Liberty – the Constitution. You cannot love what you do not comprehend. That goes for God, the law, a spouse, ad infinitum. We need a revolution in our understanding of the Constitution and of the law of Liberty. Unless we first acquire this fundamental understanding, any other type of revolution will fail. 

After we come to understand the Constitution, we’ll know how we’ve been deceived, tricked, and abused. We’ll comprehend how our elected representatives broke their oaths and sold out our Freedom for thirty pieces of silver. And we’ll realize the wisdom in Jefferson’s words: 

“[W]hen a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security.” 

As Constitution Day dawns, I call for revolution and rebellion – a revolution in our principles and understanding of our national documents and a relentless rebellion against the tyrants who have illicitly usurped power over us. Resist peacefully, if you must; but resist. Freedom is never granted or given – it is won at the price of self-sacrifice, blood, treasure, tears, and toil. Are we prepared to do what must be done? Are we prepared to fight for the Constitution? Are we prepared to live the American tradition and rebel against tyrants? 

George Washington said that “the constitution is the guide, which I never will abandon” (George Washington the Boston Selectmen, July 28, 1795). I second his pledge. I echo the voices of those fifty-six good men who signed their names to the Declaration of Independence, those who fought against their countrymen for Liberty, and those who crafted the Constitution. They won Freedom and it’s our task to restore it by reviving the Constitution and making it our gold standard once more. 

Yes, I side with the “rebels”! The rebels were on the right side of history in 1776. Rebellion to tyrants is always right. Nothing is more American than “Rebellion to Tyrants is Obedience to God.” I’m prepared to renounce and make war against anyone and anything I need to – including my government which has been hijacked by criminals – in defense of my Faith, Family, and Freedom. What could be a nobler cause to rebel over than Freedom? 

Zack Strong, 
September 16, 2021 

Enemies of the State

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“Fifty-six men with a price on their heads said we’ll be free or we’ll be dead.” – Song lyrics by Zack Strong 

Happy Independence Day, my fellow rebels! Independence Day is the day that we Americans celebrate enemies of the state who risked their lives for Freedom. Some of these enemies of the state are now national heroes. You know their names: Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, Samuel Adams, John Hancock, Patrick Henry, Benjamin Franklin, and, the biggest revolutionist of them all, George Washington. These “rebels,” as they were usually called, had death sentences placed upon them by their government for daring to declare Independence and stand up to the regime in defense of their God-given rights. 

What the American Founding Fathers did in 1776 was nothing short of remarkable. In Common Sense, Thomas Paine described the world situation at the time like this: 

“O ye that love mankind! Ye that dare oppose, not only the tyranny, but the tyrant, stand forth! Every spot of the old world is overrun with oppression. Freedom hath been hunted round the globe. Asia, and Africa, have long expelled her. Europe regards her like a stranger, and England hath given her warning to depart. O! receive the fugitive, and prepare in time an asylum for mankind.” 

America was the gathering place for rebels. It was the common home of all who hated oppression. People from around the world traveled to America to fight for Freedom shoulder to shoulder with the remarkable rebels who dared “oppose, not only the tyranny, but the tyrant.” America was in 1776, and remains, the last best hope for mankind. 

Let me emphasize this point. Prior to the American War for Independence, the British Empire spanned the globe. Europe was dominated by kingdoms, empires, and oppressive rulers. The Catholic Church’s grip had waned, but the papacy still maintained an excessive stranglehold on the minds of millions. Africa, Asia, and the Middle East were governed by warlords, pirates, or emperors. The shackles of despotism sat heavily on the human race and the little light of Liberty that faintly flickered was threatened with elimination. 

It was in this environment of worldwide tyranny that Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, George Washington, and their fellows, planted the flag of Freedom in America. Separated from the quarrels, vices, and poisoned ways of thinking of Europe and Asia, the inhabitants of the New World developed their systems of government in an atmosphere of reason and enlightenment. Early Americans were highly schooled in history, languages, and government. They read original Latin, Greek, and Hebrew works, understood Anglo-Saxon institutions, and drew enduring lessons from all ages past. They knew what tyranny was, what Liberty was, how Liberty dies, how Liberty is maintained, and how to deal with tyrants. 

Critically, the people of America, detached from the complicated, bloated governmental systems in Europe, learned how to govern themselves. Self-rule was a precious right to our forefathers. “No taxation without representation” was no hollow slogan; it was a way of life. They knew that the most effective government is that which is administered directly by the People. That is, good government relies on the individual taking care of his own business in a responsible way. It requires each citizen to be a faithful steward over his own property, rights, and deeds. If each person actively engaged in self-rule, there was no need to giant government bureaucracies, kings, or rulers. 

Thomas Jefferson, drawing upon the Anglo-Saxon tradition, described the ideal government like this: 

“[T]he way to have good and safe government, is not to trust it all to one; but to divide it among the many, distributing to every one exactly the functions he is competent to. let the National government be entrusted with the defence of the nation, and it’s foreign & federal relations; the State governments with the civil rights, laws, police & administration of what concerns the state generally; the Counties with the local concerns of the counties; and each Ward direct the interests within itself. it is by dividing and subdividing these republics from the great National one down thro’ all it’s subordinations, until it ends in the administration of every man’s farm and affairs by himself; by placing under every one what his own eye may superintend, that all will be done for the best. what has destroyed liberty and the rights of man in every government which has ever existed under the sun? the generalising & concentrating all cares and powers into one body, no matter whether of the Autocrats of Russia or France, or of the Aristocrats of a Venetian Senate. and I do believe that if the Almighty has not decreed that Man shall never be free, (and it is blasphemy to believe it) that the secret will be found to be in the making himself the depository of the powers respecting himself, so far as he is competent to them, and delegating only what is beyond his competence by a synthetical process, to higher & higher orders of functionaries, so as to trust fewer and fewer powers, in proportion as the trustees become more and more oligarchical. the elementary republics of the wards, the county republics, the State republics, and the republic of the Union, would form a gradation of authorities, standing each on the basis of law, holding every one it’s delegated share of powers, and constituting truly a system of fundamental balances and checks for the government. where every man is a sharer in the direction of his ward-republic, or of some of the higher ones, and feels that he is a participator in the government of affairs not merely at an election, one day in the year, but every day; when there shall not be a man in the state who will not be a member of some one of it’s councils, great or small, he will let the heart be torn out of his body sooner than his power be wrested from him by a Caesar or a Bonaparte” (Thomas Jefferson to Joseph C. Cabell, February 2, 1816). 

This was revolutionary thinking then and it’s still uncommon today. The idea that man could control his own destiny and govern himself was as foreign to Europe as to Asia. It was rejected by corrupt religious authorities and autocrats alike. Yet, a band of Americans led by the Sons of Liberty fellow “rebels,” insisted that God made man a free agent and that he therefore had the right, and ability, to govern himself. 

As Jefferson said, good government is not centralized in the hands of the state. Good government is “the administration of every man’s farm and affairs by himself.” Self-government is the only good government. No state, king, ruler, emperor, pope, tsar, guru, president, or judge has authority over the individual because the individual received his rights and responsibilities from the God who created him. Man may delegate portions of his authority to a government, but he never gives away his power – not even the majority of it. 

This is what the American Founding Fathers understood. This is the idea they tried to spread. They wanted all people to be free and they opposed all systems that oppressed the human mind. 

Unbeknownst to most Americans is the fact that when the Founding Fathers declared Independence for America, they invited the world to join them. They specifically invited other oppressed British colonies, from Ireland to Canada and beyond, to join in their Revolution for Freedom. The others, for various reasons, did not join the cause, though some were sympathetic. As noted, individuals from many nations, sensing that something special was occurring in America, left their homelands to fight for the “rebels” in the name of personal Liberty. 

The American War for Independence was never intended to be a war for the People of the New World alone. Rather, it was intended to be the opening salvo in a war against tyranny everywhere. Early Americans often called what they were creating an “Empire of Liberty.” They wanted that “empire” to span the globe. They wanted Freedom to be found in every corner of the earth. It is that fact that caused America’s enemies to hate her in her infancy and it is that fact that causes her enemies to loathe her today. 

At the same time the Founding Fathers were declaring Independence and showing mankind the path toward Freedom, another entity was perfecting a plan to enslave the world. Adam Weishaupt formed the Order of Illuminati on May 1, 1776. As I’ve detailed repeatedly here, in other articles and podcasts, and in my books, the Illuminati were the literal and ideological forebears of the communists. Their plan was published by Karl Marx, who was hired by an Illuminati offshoot known as the League of the Just to write The Communist Manifesto. Weishaupt, Marx, Lenin, Stalin, and the rest, were following the same blueprint and working toward the same goal. Thus, when we talk about America as the “main enemy” of the Soviet Union, we’re also saying that America is the “main enemy” of the Order of Illuminati and of all world conspiracy. 

Though the U.S. government has de facto joined, or been largely captured by, the communist-Illuminati conspiracy, there are tens of millions of armed and awake Americans who reject that conspiracy. Some 80 million people voted for Donald Trump, just to give an indication of how many people refuse to comply with the cabal. Our combined enemy can’t suffer recalcitrant “rebels” like the “bitter clingers” in the flyover states. It makes their blood boil to know that the blood of patriots flows in our veins. The Founding Fathers were the enemies of the British monarchical state and today the American constitutionalist patriots are the enemies of the global Marxist state. 

This Independence Day, we need to remember how special America is. America is an experiment in self-government. She’s an attempt to expand natural law and God-given rights to every part of the earth in a gigantic “Empire of Liberty.” Nothing like this has ever been undertaken. America today – particularly armed, Christian, white America – is the standard-bearer. The global conspiracy has marshalled all its forces against us. 

There are others in different lands who love Freedom, too, but none of them are in a position to do much about it. Only Americans are capable of rebelling. Only we, armed with our Second Amendment, Constitution, and heritage of Independence, can truly be “up in arms” against the one-world Marxist Establishment. We can’t let the world down. We can’t let ourselves down. We can’t betray the memory of those who risked it all to give us a free nation. It’s time to declare “Liberty or death!” and mean it. Happy Independence Day.

Zack Strong,

July 4, 2021

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Victory or Death – Crossing Our Delaware in 2021

On Christmas night, 1776, General George Washington led an audacious military assault on Hessian mercenaries fighting for the despotic British monarchy. The assault required General Washington’s ragtag band of underfed, badly clothed, and poorly trained soldiers to cross the frozen Delaware River in the dead of night, march nineteen miles in a blizzard, and attack professional, well-supplied Hessian soldiers. The plan was improbable at best and General Washington knew it was a do-or-die situation not only for his men, but for the American Revolution. As he set out to attack the enemy in Trenton that Christmas Day in 1776, the General issued a countersign, a challenge, and a command to his men: “Victory or Death.”

“Victory or Death” was no exaggeration. It was a dire situation for Washington and the fledgling American nation. In his phenomenal book The Making of America, W. Cleon Skousen described the condition of the Continental Army as Christmas 1776 approached:

“With December drawing to a close, Washington found that he had not only been deserted by Congress, but 6,000 of his soldiers were anxious to leave for home in two weeks when their enlistments ran out. Meanwhile, General Howe, who had chased Washington across New Jersey, had so little regard for what was left of the ragtag American army that he retired to New York to enjoy his new honor of being knighted for capturing New York. He left Lord Cornwallis at Princeton and assigned approximately 1,200 Hessians to guard Trenton. Howe felt any new action could wait until spring.

“But Washington could not wait for even two weeks. His troops were not only demoralized, hungry, and ill-equipped, but most of them would soon be leaving.

“On December 23 Washington formed his bedraggled Americans into ranks and had them listen to a stirring message written by Thomas Paine. It included the famous words which have been recited by Americans from that day to this:

““These are the times that try men’s souls. The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of their country; but he that stands it now, deserves the love and thanks of man and woman”” (W. Cleon Skousen, The Making of America: The Substance and Meaning of the Constitution, 79).

Paine’s patriotic message roused Washington’s beleaguered troops to a degree and the General staked the Revolution on a daring attack on the invading enemy which sat encamped across the river in Trenton. On the same day, December 23, General Washington wrote to Colonel Joseph Reed of his battle plan:

“Christmas day at Night, one hour before day is the time fixed upon for our Attempt on Trenton. For heaven’s sake keep this to yourself, as the discovery of it may prove fatal to us, our numbers, sorry I am to say, being less than I had any conception of—but necessity, dire necessity will—nay must justify any [attack]” (George Washington to Joseph Reed, December 23, 1776).

“Dire necessity” and sheer desperation compelled Washington to strike. With Thomas Paine’s words in his mind, the General issued his “Victory or Death” password to his men. Dr. Benjamin Rush, one of the Founding Fathers, visited the General on Christmas Eve. He described what happened during their conversation:

“[General Washington] appeared much depressed, and lamented the ragged and dissolving state of his army in affecting terms. I gave him assurance of the disposition of Congress to support him, and while I was talking to him, I observed him to play with his pen and ink upon several small pieces of paper. One fell upon the floor near my feet. I was struck with the inscription upon it; it was ‘Victory or Death’. The next day I had reason to believe, that in my interview with Washington that he had been meditating his attack on the Hessians for I found that the countersign of his troops at Trenton was Victory or Death.”

To prepare for his triumph or demise, General Washington devised a three-pronged attack on Trenton. His force of 2,400 men was to attack Trenton directly, supported by two additional groups totaling 2,600 soldiers. The General, ever a master of deception and strategy, had hidden boats painted black along the river which would be used for the crossing. So, as Christmas Day came to a close, the patriot army moved out with “Victory or Death” weighing heavily on their minds.

Setting off at 11 P.M., the men struggled to row their boats across the frozen river as the wind howled and sleet hit. An article describes the feat as follows:

“Henry Knox, Washington’s chief of artillery, had organized the crossing, which would be imperiled by floating ice. Men who got wet faced grave risks of frostbite and freezing to death. Because of the ice and bad weather, the crossing, which was to be complete at midnight, was not finished until early the next morning.”

Because of the severe winter weather, only General Washington’s assault force managed to cross the Delaware that night, upending the three-pronged attack plan. Once across the river, Washington’s freezing men began a long march through snow toward Trenton. An officer close to General Washington during these events, James Wikinson, made a famous remark about the sacrifices made by the troops that decisive night:

“I received the necessary directions, and proceeded in quest of the troops, whose route was easily traced, as there was a little snow on the ground, which was tinged here and there with blood from the feet of the men who wore broken shoes” (James Wikinson, Memoirs of My Own Times, Vol. 1, 127).

Tired, wet, cold, and bleeding, Washington’s ill-prepared men arrived on the outskirts of Trenton around 8 A.M. They immediately attacked the surprised Hessians with cannon and bayonets, pushing them back into, and then out of, the town. Washington’s warriors killed 22 Hessian mercenaries, wounded 92 more, and captured 918. Four hundred escaped and fled to their British employers. On our side, only two men lost their lives due to the frozen weather. Not one soul died in the battle. It was a total, sweeping victory for forces of the Revolution!

The Battle of Trenton, and the precarious river crossing that made it possible, lit a fire that fueled the dwindling Revolution. It breathed fresh air into the patriots’ lungs. It gave them confidence that yes, victory was indeed an option. And, for many, it fossilized confidence in General Washington’s capacity to snatch victory from the jaws of looming defeat. In short, Washington’s Crossing saved the War for Independence.

The Constitution Daily has written:

“An inspired Washington and his troops, who adopted the motto “Victory or Death,” crossed the Delaware River during a Nor’easter on Christmas Day and routed the Hessian garrison at Trenton.

“The much-needed victory galvanized the Revolutionary forces and the Continental Congress. Troops decided to re-enlist as Washington’s forces won a second battle at Trenton and a key engagement at Princeton.”

Though we could devote many pages to discussing the Battles of Trenton and Princeton, the two additional Delaware crossings that took place during the famous campaign, and the many ins and outs of the whole affair, the preceding information is sufficient to impress the reader with the great importance of Washington’s victory. The General’s resolute determination to win or fall, to claim victory or suffer death at Trenton, is an enduring part of the American story.

Against all odds, the American “rebels,” as their enemies called them, routed the invading British and their homegrown Tory supporters and planted the standard of Liberty on this continent. They established a Constitution which is unrivaled still today and which, when properly followed, secures our God-given rights unlike any form of government known to man. The blood that flowed in these good patriots’ veins flows in ours. The same spirit which animated them and urged them to fight for their Faith, Families, and Freedom is the same which inspires all patriots today to stand against the combined forces of tyranny.

As 2020 draws to a close, every sincere soul knows that our national situation is becoming dire. Those of us who love Freedom, God, and the Republic, have figuratively been pushed across the Delaware and the enemy is encamped on the other side preparing for their final assault. Many in our ranks are demoralized and frustrated. The deck seems stacked against us. Our supply lines have grown thin. We face a better-organized, better-trained, better-positioned internal enemy aided by mercenaries from foreign nations. The storm is howling, the ice is blocking our path, and many of our allies have fallen by the wayside and are either unwilling or unable to help us. Yet, notwithstanding the hardship and the odds, we are led in the front by the spirit of General Washington and his timeless motto: Victory or Death.

This is our time, fellow patriots. 2021 is our time to do the unexpected and cross our own Delaware. It might seem improbable, insane, or potentially fatal to face down the Establishment and fight such an entrenched enemy, but what other option do we have? We can surrender and sink into boot-licking serfdom or we can fight. We can slavishly submit to four years of an illegitimate presidency packed with the worst degenerates ever to enter American politics or we can resist. We can watch as usurpers take a chainsaw to our remaining Liberties or we can do what the men of 1776 did and say “Victory or Death.”

In his famous 1775 speech, Patrick Henry told his fellow countrymen who waffled and wondered whether it was prudent to fight against government tyranny that the war has already begun! The war, he noted, was not theoretical, but existed in actual fact, even if it did not yet exist in name. He asserted:

“Gentlemen may cry, Peace, Peace– but there is no peace. The war is actually begun! The next gale that sweeps from the north will bring to our ears the clash of resounding arms! Our brethren are already in the field! Why stand we here idle? What is it that gentlemen wish? What would they have? Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me liberty or give me death!”

America is at war. We are besieged by traitors within and enemies without. The homegrown traitors and the foreign enemies share a common goal – the destruction of American Freedom and the incorporation of our nation into a global dictatorship controlled by a sadistic socialistic Elite. This is the harsh reality. Ignoring it won’t make it go away and won’t lessen the severity of the struggle or save you from becoming a casualty.

This enemy has, over the course of many decades, infiltrated our government, press, and society, usurping tremendous power. On November 3, the cabal showed its power by blatantly stealing the election from President Donald Trump and handing it to a corrupt Chinese puppet, Joe Biden, and his gaggle of gangsters, Marxists, and thugs. The international conspiracy used its corrupt machinery of state to silence the voices of 75 million Americans who selected Donald Trump as their president. Instead, the conspiracy dictates that we shall march obediently into high-tech slavery patterned off of Soviet Russia and Red China.

Here’s the catch: Real Americans don’t obey tyrants; we shoot them. We cross frozen rivers, march in freezing rain, and attack on the holidays if need be. We use deception, guerrilla warfare, and don’t play fair. When our families are threatened with slavery; when our Freedom is hunted without mercy; and when our nation faces conquest by a murderous communist leviathan with an unrivaled track record of bloodshed and treachery, there’s nothing we wouldn’t do to stop it.

Will we, as Americans, rally to stop the steal taking place so brazenly before our eyes? We’ve allowed so much of our Freedom and prosperity to be bartered away already. Are we willing to allow the rest to be stolen from us and, with it, any hope of ever reforming our country without bloody civil war? Now is our time. January 2021 is our do-or-die moment. It is now that we will decide whether we will reap victory or death. If we do not act like real men and face the freezing storms, bitter marches, and professional mercenaries, our Republic will be taken from us once and for all and only blood will win it back.

The same James Wilkinson quoted above made another comment worth remembering as we contemplate doing what needs to be done in 2021 to save our Republic. He wrote:

“Born with iron nerves, and an unbending dignity of port, which distinguished all his actions, and struck the most presumptuous with awe, General Washington amidst those those scenes which “tried men’s souls,” serene, tranquil, and self-possessed, excited the admiration of his followers, and exhibited the heroic example of a chief determined to brave danger and dare death in support of a just cause, and the defence of the most precious rights and interests of mankind; whilst the invincible firmness of Congress . . . exhibited to the world the rare example of a popular assembly, united in principle, inflexible in purpose, and regardless of consequences. Not to one man then, but to such a Congress and such a chief, supported by the handful of brave men who adhered to the cause of their country, are these United States indebted for the cheap purchase of their liberty; and I shall be acquitted of vanity when I acknowledge the sweet solace I derive from the consciousness, that I was one of the little band who faced the storm, when the summer soldier and the sunshine patriot hid their heads” (James Wilkinson, Memoirs of My Own Times, Vol. 1, 122).

Are you prepared to follow in the blood-stained footsteps of “the handful of brave men who adhered to the cause of their country” and fought the American Revolution so that we might be free? Are we prepared to “face the storm” even when the sunshine patriots and summer soldiers turn away, hide their faces, and cower in their homes? Are we prepared, truly and honestly, to brave the dark winter that we’ve been thrust into by our enemies and fight them by every means until either victory is ours or death carries us to our Maker?

General Washington may not be with us in the flesh, but his dauntless spirit rides before us. The standard of Liberty erected by faithful men in 1776 remains despite all attempts to topple it. The Constitution, written by inspired and wise men, still safeguards our rights whenever we hearken to its counsel. I pray that we may cross our own Delaware this coming January and show such as spirit of resistance that we stop the theft of the presidency by our eternal communist foes. If we do not rectify this situation and restore the ballot box, only the bullet box remains to secure our God-given Freedom. One way or the other, we will have victory or we will have death. There is no alternative.

Zack Strong,

December 26, 2020

The Ongoing American Revolution

The American Revolution was not an event that began and ended at two fixed points in time. We mark the beginning of the War for Independence on July 4, 1776, and traditionally say the Revolution ended in 1783 with the Treaty of Paris, but the reality is that Independence Day merely marked a boiling point in a sweeping Liberty movement that began much earlier and which has not yet reached its culmination. The American Revolution is ongoing! The War for Independence is being waged today as fiercely as when our patriot forefathers squared off against the British invaders.

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In 1787, Dr. Benjamin Rush made an illuminating remark. He said:

There is nothing more common, than to confound the terms of American Revolution with those of the late American war. The American war is over: but this is far from being the case with the American revolution. On the contrary, nothing but the first act of the great drama is closed. It remains yet to establish and perfect our new forms of government; and to prepare the principles, morals, and manners of our citizens, for these forms of government, after they are established and brought to perfection” (Benjamin Rush, Address to the People of the United States, 1787, in Hezekiah Niles, ed., Principles and Acts of the Revolution, 234).

According to Dr. Rush, the genuine American Revolution consisted of the transformation and improvement of the “principles, morals, and manners” of the American People. What’s more, he saw this as a gradual process that, years after the War for Independence ended, had not yet finished. It was one thing to create a new nation with a novel system of government, but quite another thing to create a citizenry prepared for life under that government. Molding such a people – one worthy of republican institutions of self-government – was the true revolutionary task.

Another Founding Father, John Adams, concurred that the real American Revolution was not the short War for Independence, but a vastly more significant undertaking. He observed:

But what do We mean by the American Revolution? Do We mean the American War? The Revolution was effected before the War commenced. The Revolution was in the Minds and Hearts of the People. A Change in their Religious Sentiments of their Duties and Obligations. . . .

This radical Change in the Principles, Opinions Sentiments and Affection of the People, was the real American Revolution” (John Adams to Hezekiah Niles, February 13, 1818).

Both Dr. Rush and Mr. Adams agreed that the betterment of American principles and morals – both religious and political – was the real American Revolution. This Revolution happened in the hearts and minds of our countrymen long before the shot heard ‘round the world and continued long after the cannon ceased firing. One could look back to the Reformation or Renaissance to find the origin of the Liberty movement that eventually found its true expression in America. But for our purposes, we can trace the origin of the flame of Freedom to the First Great Awakening that took place roughly between the 1730s and 1760s.

It was during the First Great Awakening, when Americans turned their hearts back to the great God of the universe, that the revolution of principles spoken of by John Adams occurred. Church pulpits were ablaze with fiery sermons on Freedom. Preachers led the way in social reform and prepared Americans to defend their rights and stand like real men against despots. Schools were no less valuable. Teachers instructed children not only in constitutional principles and the science of good government, but in the “perfect law of liberty” given by Jesus Christ (James 1:25). In short, American Christians kneeled before the Lord in genuine humility, and then rose with staunch determination to follow Him and safeguard their God-given rights.

It was a band of Christian militiamen, inspired by their Reverend Jonas Clark, who defiantly stood with Captain John Parker on Lexington green in 1775 as an army of 700 Redcoats came to confiscate their firearms. It was a band of 56 patriots who signed and published the Declaration of Independence, announcing their determination to be free and their proclaiming their firm reliance on the protection of divine Providence.” And it was the Christian Father of our Country, George Washington, who told the nation during his First Inaugural Address:

No People can be bound to acknowledge and adore the invisible hand, which conducts the Affairs of men more than the People of the United States. Every step, by which they have advanced to the character of an independent nation, seems to have been distinguished by some token of providential agency.”

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It was this acknowledgment of God and His laws, including the “perfect law of liberty” noted earlier, that gave our forefathers the strength and tenacity to stand against monarchical tyranny. They were an educated and bright People. They understood self-government and cherished their Freedom to worship their God according to the dictates of their conscience, their Freedom to speak, their Freedom to assemble, their Freedom to bear and use arms to protect themselves and their rights, and so forth. In short, it was their mental and spiritual devotion to their Faith, Families, and Freedom, and their fidelity to these loyalties, that called down Heaven’s blessings on their behalf.

Our noble forefathers did not stop progressing when they went back to the business of daily life after the Revolution. Rather, they went on to produce the inspired Constitution and Bill of Rights, expand the borders of the Republic, and, thus, the borders of Liberty, alter their local laws and customs, prepare to end the vice of slavery, and generally became an industrious, enlightened, and patriotic People.

According to one contemporary figure of significant renown, American greatness reached its zenith during the Age of Jackson. He observed:

In continuation of such noble sentiments, Gen. [Andrew] Jackson, upon his ascension to the great chair of the chief magistracy: said, “As long as our government is administered for the good of the people, and is regulated by their will; as long as it secures to us the rights of person and property, liberty of conscience, and of the press, it will be worth defending; and so long as it is worth defending, a patriotic militia will cover it with an impenetrable aegis.”

General Jackson’s administration may be denominated the acme of American glory, liberty and prosperity, for the national debt, which in 1815, on account of the late war, was $125,000,000, and lessened gradually, was paid up in his golden day; and preparations were made to distribute the surplus revenue among the several states: and that august patriot, to use his own words in his farewell address, retired leaving “a great people prosperous and happy, in the full enjoyment of liberty and peace, honored and respected by every nation of the world”” (Joseph Smith, General Smith’s Views of the Powers and Policy of Government of the United States, February, 1844).

Andrew Jackson was one of the greatest American heroes. Today, he is hated and castigated by an ignorant generation that has lost touch with America’s original values and has been deceived by culture-destroying Marxists. But the truth is that General Jackson put America first, fought for his country his whole life as a soldier and statesman, fastidiously upheld the Constitution as president, waged veritable war against the conspiratorial banking cartel that wanted to enslave the Union, and was an honorable man of his word.

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Additionally, President Jackson was the only president to ever pay off the national debt in full. The American People prospered under his hand and it was during his administration that Alexis de Tocqueville visited the United States and remarked:

The progress of society in America is precipitate, and almost revolutionary. . . .

. . . The Americans of the United States must inevitably become one of the greatest nations in the world; their offset will cover almost the whole of North America; the continent which they inhabit is their dominion, and it cannot escape them . . . Riches, power, and renown, cannot fail to be theirs at some future time” (Alexis de Tocqueville, Democracy in America, Vol. 1, 434-435).

The American People did not stop their rapid progress and march toward destiny after the War for Independence. That was but a prelude to greater things. For them, as for Benjamin Rush, the American Revolution was ongoing; a process, not an event.

However, after the Age of Jackson, the Republic began to decline in important ways. Over time, we became so prosperous, powerful, and prominent in the world that we began to shed our humility, forget our past, and neglect our participation in self-government. We became reluctant to enforce the ideals of the Declaration of Independence and apply the Constitution as broadly as it was intended to be applied. The Civil War later rocked the nation, caused deep wounds, and resulted in a massively enlarged government that began intruding into our lives as never before.

In spite of the trials of the Nineteenth Century, on the whole, our People put their trust in God and looked to the Constitution and the men who made it for guidance. As the decades slipped by, the pull of prosperity and allure of modern conveniences took us away from the pursuit of Liberty and thrust us into the pursuit of materialism. We stopped studying the art of law. We ignored our governmental duties, allowing an organized group of traitors to come to power over us. We lived our lives in relative peace and disinterest as they hijacked our economy through the Federal Reserve. They put their men – FDR, Wilson, Carter, Bush, Obama, and others – into the presidency. They changed our laws and amended the Constitution in frightful ways. They thrust a dagger in Lady Liberty’s back and began twisting it menacingly.

Closer to home, the agents of cultural Marxism went to work to warp our view of marriage and families. They promoted hedonism and placed sex on a pedestal. They pushed filth and degeneracy, greed and selfishness, perversion and humanism. We began to lose our faith in the Creator – the source from whence our forefathers said came our unalienable rights of life, Liberty, and property. And so it has gone for over a century until now we see the fruit of the gruesome harvest – chaos, rioting, violence, hatred, division, unchecked governmental power, neglect of the Constitution, scientific and medical tyranny, anti-Christian bullying, high-tech censorship, societal distrust, and rampant unbelief in God.

Despite this growing darkness, many of the good people of this nation are waking up. It is in darkness, after all, that the light shines brightest. People from coast to coast have realized that the conspiracy – call it the “swamp,” “deep state,” the “Establishment,” or whatever name you will – is very real and threatens to overturn our Faith, Families, and Freedom. The American giant is beginning to stir and push back against the bands that traitors have tied around her. Lady Liberty is waking up from her deep sleep.

A general feeling is beginning to filter out and permeate the nation wherever good people still reside. It’s palpable and vibrant. The feeling is that revolution is upon us – the time for cleansing and refreshing is nearly here. Perhaps unconsciously, millions of Americans feel what Thomas Jefferson felt and articulated. He said:

[W]hat country can preserve it’s liberties if their rulers are not warned from time to time that their people preserve the spirit of resistance? Let them take arms. The remedy is to set them right as to facts, pardon and pacify them. What signify a few lives lost in a century or two? The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants. It is it’s natural manure” (Thomas Jefferson to William Stephens Smith, November 13, 1787).

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But how will we rally ourselves and refresh the tree of Liberty? Everywhere I go, on every social media page I visit, in church congregations, and in private conversations, I see people asking roughly the same questions: “Where is the next George Washington? Where is our generation’s Thomas Jefferson? When will the next Boston Tea Party happen? When will someone step forward to lead another revolution to reclaim our Freedom?”

As these questions demonstrate, the sincere desire for change – for a return to our roots – is there. It may be in its infancy, but it is growing and rapidly gaining strength. It needs focus, however. It needs leaders. It needs experienced patriots to form us into a fighting force for Freedom.

In an attributed letter of Samuel Adams to James Warren on October 24, 1780, we find these relevant words: “If ever the Time should come, when vain & aspiring Men shall possess the highest Seats in Government, our Country will stand in Need of its experienced Patriots to prevent its Ruin.”

Where are we to find such men and women? Where are the John Adamses and George Washingtons? Where are the Sons of Liberty and militiamen of Concord Bridge? Who will step forward to lead the next chapter in the ongoing American Revolution?

The answer is two-fold. First, though you and I may not be the next George Washington, we may be like those men who marched in his army, crossed the frigid Delaware with him on Christmas morning, and together endured winter in Valley Forge. We may not command the patriot force, but we may be part of it. It may be our eternal honor to march alongside other patriots, either figuratively or literally, to victories as glorious as Yorktown.

No, we may never wear the general’s cap, but we can wear the revolutionary uniform. What good is even the greatest general without his fighting men? What good are fighting men without virtuous women supporting them? And in the war of ideas and principles, women – as mothers and as homemakers – have an absolutely essential role to play. We cannot effect a new revolution without their selfless service in the home, for as goes the home goes the nation.

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To elaborate, I ask, what good is a Declaration of Independence without men to win, and then maintain, Independence? There could have been no Age of Jackson with its prosperity and expansion without those willing to establish and sustain the great institutions of our Republic. Thankfully, earlier patriots have already established beautiful constitutional institutions for us. We don’t need to think outside the box – we need to merely dust out the box of the filth that has cluttered it. And we can kick-start the process by educating ourselves in correct principles.

To repeat, this war is primarily waged on the battlefields of the mind and heart. It is waged on Facebook and Twitter, in public school classrooms and around the dinner table, in private conversations with friends and worship services with your neighbors. It is waged on election day as well as every other day. Our just and holy cause is furthered by acts of service in our communities, by giving proper instruction to our children, by coherent and sincere social media posts, by participation in peaceful assemblies, and by a million other little acts, words, and moments that come in daily life.

Together, these seemingly small deeds constitute a revolution in principles, morals, and manners. Do not think you need George Washington to ride before you in order to participate in the ongoing American Revolution. It is your distinct privilege to fight these battles every day in your home, at church, at work, online, and in the most basic interactions with your countrymen. There will be no great political revolution until we first reform our minds and hearts as our ancestors did prior to challenging the British at Lexington and Concord.

Second, though we all must be engaged in the daily acts of revolution just described, there must be individuals who step forward to rally, unify, and lead those who love Liberty. These figures must have dignity and credibility. They must be men of honor, goodness, virtue, truth, and stability. They must be men of high ideals and lofty standards. They must be noble in heart, valiant in spirit, but humble enough to kneel before their God and petition His blessings upon our cause.

Patriot leaders must be found and thrust to the forefront. As it often goes, the most qualified for leadership are those who want nothing more than to live in peace. They don’t seek the limelight, but merely to do their part, quietly, to support their Faith, Family, and Freedom.

It is instructive to know that George Washington did not want to lead the Continental Army. Yet, he threw himself into the task when the People’s representatives called on him to do so. After the War for Independence, he retired to the peace and quite of his farm. Yet, when his countrymen selected him to be the first president, he came out of retirement and fulfilled that duty honorably. The same is true of Thomas Jefferson, who retired to Monticello before being drafted by his country to serve in the government. And that is the key word – serve. We don’t need self-important politicians, but public servants who labor on our behalf to secure for us the blessings of Liberty.

Today, we must find those people in our communities who are prepared for a call to service. They may not want to serve, they may not want to hold a position of public trust, they may not want to wade into the treacherous swamp of modern politics, but they will respond to the call the serve because their hearts burn with the fire of Freedom. It is our duty as citizens to find the next Thomas Jefferson and draft him into leadership. It is our duty as freemen to find the next George Washington and urge him to lead us against the traitors who have entrenched themselves in our nation. In short, we may say that the next George Washington will not appear unless We the People call him into service.

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Dear reader, America is the greatest nation on earth, bar none. There has never been a greater Republic. There has never been a People who did more good for the cause of Freedom than the People of the United States. Our country is sick with an alien virus – the Red Plague of communism with its horrid atheism, immorality, and totalitarianism. We must recognize that this plague is hostile to everything our People stands for and that it will result in our demise as a free nation if we do not recognize it, quarantine it, and exterminate it.

Let’s first extinguish the virus in our hearts and minds by turning back to the God who granted us life and Liberty, to the Constitution which holds our Union together, and to the Founding Fathers who marked the path to Freedom for all peoples in all generations. Let’s rekindle the unique American spirit. On the eve of battle in 1776, George Washington encouraged his men to “remember . . . that you are Freemen, fighting for the blessings of liberty” (George Washington General Orders, August 23, 1776). Let’s do our part to remind ourselves, and teach our precious children, that we are freemen fighting for our Faith, Families, and Freedom!

Speaking at Mount Rushmore on July 3, 2020, President Donald Trump made the following pledge which we can all claim as our own. It can be our starting place as revolutionary Americans. It can be our promise to ourselves and our children:

[L]et us go forward united in our purpose and re-dedicated in our resolve. We will raise the next generation of American patriots. We will write the next thrilling chapter of the American adventure. And we will teach our children to know that they live in a land of legends, that nothing can stop them, and that no one can hold them down. They will know that in America, you can do anything, you can be anything, and together, we can achieve anything.

Uplifted by the titans of Mount Rushmore, we will find unity that no one expected; we will make strides that no one thought possible. This country will be everything that our citizens have hoped for, for so many years, and that our enemies fear — because we will never forget that American freedom exists for American greatness. And that’s what we have: American greatness.

Centuries from now, our legacy will be the cities we built, the champions we forged, the good we did, and the monuments we created to inspire us all.

My fellow citizens: America’s destiny is in our sights. America’s heroes are embedded in our hearts. America’s future is in our hands. And ladies and gentlemen: the best is yet to come.”

Yes, the best is still to come! We will yet see dark days. They will inevitably grow darker than they are now. But even as our enemies make their final, vain attempt to subjugate our nation, our People will awaken, arise, and rally behind the inspired standard of Liberty. We will recapture the Faith of our forefathers, fortify our Families, and reclaim our Freedom. Victory will be ours!

My soul gushes with thanksgiving to my God for the blessings He has rained down upon America! I love America! I love the Constitution and the honorable men who created it, which includes one of my own ancestors, Caleb Strong, to whom I pay tribute. I love the unrivaled heritage of Freedom we posses here in America. Let us never take it for granted. Let’s gather our children around us today, read to them the Declaration of Independence, and convey to them how much we love this land and the unparalleled rights we enjoy here.

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This Independence Day, be more than a spectator; participate in your Independence. I urge my fellow Americans to fall on their knees, cry to their Father in Heaven, petition the Lord for His strength, and then rise with renewed determination to be Sons of Liberty. We are American freemen. Liberty is our birthright and our destiny. May God help us become soldiers in this sacred struggle, to find and support our Washingtons and Jeffersons, and honorably play our part in this ongoing American Revolution!

Zack Strong,

July 4, 2020

Indispensable Men: George Washington

“[A]n impartial World will say with you that he is the Greatest Man on Earth.” – William Hooper to Robert Morris, February 1, 1777.

Numerous patriots came together to bring about and accomplish America’s War for Independence, write her Constitution, and establish our cherished Republic. Among these patriots, several stalwart figures stand out as vital to the cause. These are the indispensable men America needed and without whom our bid for Independence would have failed. This “Indispensable Men” series pays tribute to these larger-than-life heroes and the role they played in giving Liberty a proper home.

Hundreds of books, biographies, and documentaries have been produced telling the technical details and stories of George Washington’s upbringing, career, family, and home life, and the interworkings of his presidential administration and command as general. I don’t feel the need to reproduce those facts here. I simply refer you to the best book I know of on Washington’s life and achievements; namely, The Real George Washington written by Jay A. Parry, Andrew M. Allison, and W. Cleon Skousen and published by the National Center for Constitutional Studies. My aim in this series is, rather, to highlight the key ideas, crucial character traits, and most notable public achievements of the “indispensable” figures in the story of American Freedom.

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No man more deserves the first spot on the “indispensable men” list than George Washington, the great general of the Revolution and the Father of our Country. The unchallenged historical consensus is that no man was more respected and admired in our founding era than George Washington. Washington’s impressive record demonstrates the great trust his countrymen had in him and speaks to the tremendous influence he had in his day.

A brief index of George Washington’s public achievements and prominent positions looks like this:

1) Washington began his public service as a soldier. During the French and Indian War, Washington gained valuable command experience and reputation and was promoted to the rank of colonel in the Virginia militia.

2) In 1774, he was elected as a Virginia delegate to the First and Second Continental Congresses. During the Second Continental Congress, the Continental Army was created and George Washington was chosen as its commander-in-chief.

3) During the War for Independence, General Washington served as the supreme leader of the Continental Army, saved the Army from defeat numerous times through his skill and decisive will power, and brought the conflagration to a successful conclusion.

4) Four years after humbly resigning his charge as commander-in-chief and retiring to his plantation in 1783, Washington helped orchestrate the Constitutional Convention to save the faltering nation. Washington was unanimously elected as the president of the Convention.

5) In 1789, Washington became the first president of our Republic and to this day is the only man to ever be unanimously elected by the Electoral College. He in fact accomplished this feat twice, speaking to the level of admiration and trust given to him by his contemporaries. The later federal capital district was also named in his honor.

Being a successful military general, a unanimously-elected head of state, the president of the Convention which produced the longest-standing national charter in history, and having a national capitol named in your honor, are things that not many other people can put on a resume. On paper, then, there is zero doubt that George Washington deserves a seat at the “indispensable men” table. But there was much more to his rave popularity than merely holding prominent positions during monumental events.

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Washington’s positions as general and president, as noteworthy as they are, did not make others respect him. Rather, Washington was appointed and elected to those positions because of the supreme respect and admiration others already had for him. And this admiration was engendered by his strong character and unique spirit. Historian Gordon Wood has written:

“Washington’s genius, Washington’s greatness, lay in his character. He was, as Chateaubriand said, a “hero of an unprecedented kind.” There had never been a great man quite like Washington . . . Washington became a great man and was acclaimed as a classical hero because of the way he conducted himself during times of temptation. It was his moral character that set him off from other men.

“Washington epitomized everything the revolutionary generation prized in its leaders. He had character and was truly a man of virtue. This virtue was not given to him by nature. He had to work for it, to cultivate it, and everyone sensed that. Washington was a self-made hero, and this impressed an eighteenth-century enlightened world that put great stock in men’s controlling both their passions and their destinies. Washington seemed to possess a self-cultivated nobility” (Gordon S. Wood, Revolutionary Characters: What Made the Founders Different, 34-35).

Yet, it is not what modern historians have said about Washington that is so remarkable. Rather, the fact that the American People and his contemporaries in governmental affairs, and even his enemies across the sea, lavished him with praise. We now rehearse some of the acclaim this man received by those who knew him and were in a position to judge the sincerity and depth of his character.

Thomas Jefferson was intimately acquainted with Washington both before he was appointed general and throughout his time in military and government service. Jefferson wrote to future president James Monroe of Washington’s mass appeal in these words:

“Congress have risen. You will have seen by their proceedings the truth of what I always observed to you, that one man outweighs them all in influence over the people who have supported his judgment against their own and that of their representatives. Republicanism must lie on it’s oars, resign the vessel to it’s pilot, and themselves to the course he thinks best for them” (Thomas Jefferson to James Monroe, June 12, 1796).

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Another time, Jefferson gave an in-depth evaluation of Washington’s character and many of his traits, including his sense of justice, his reasoning abilities, and his will power. I do not quote everything Jefferson said, but enough to demonstrate why Washington was so revered by his associates:

“I think I knew General Washington intimately and thoroughly; and were I called on to delineate his character it should be in terms like these.

“His mind was great and powerful, without being of the very first order; his penetration strong, tho’ not so acute as that of a Newton, Bacon or Locke; and as far as he saw, no judgment was ever sounder. it was slow in operation, being little aided by invention or imagination, but sure in conclusion. hence the common remark of his officers, of the advantage he derived from councils of war, where hearing all suggestions, he selected whatever was best. and certainly no General ever planned his battles more judiciously . . . he was incapable of fear, meeting personal dangers with the calmest unconcern. perhaps the strongest feature in his character was prudence, never acting until every circumstance, every consideration was maturely weighed; refraining if he saw a doubt, but, when once decided, going through with his purpose whatever obstacles opposed. his integrity was most pure, his justice the most inflexible I have ever known, no motives of interest or consanguinity, of friendship or hatred, being able to bias his decision. he was indeed, in every sense of the words, a wise, a good, & a great man . . . his person, you know, was fine, his stature exactly what one would wish, his deportment easy, erect, and noble; the best horseman of his age, and the most graceful figure that could be seen on horseback . . . on the whole, his character was, in it’s mass perfect, in nothing bad, in few points indifferent; and it may truly be said that never did nature and fortune combine more perfectly to make a man great, and to place him in the same constellation with whatever worthies have merited from man an everlasting remembrance. for his was the singular destiny & merit of leading the armies of his country succesfully thro’ an arduous war for the establishment of it’s independance, of conducting it’s councils thro’ the birth of a government, new in it’s forms and principles, until it had settled down into a quiet and orderly train, and of scrupulously obeying the laws, thro’ the whole of his career, civil and military, of which the history of the world furnishes no other example . . . I am satisfied the great body of republicans thinks of him as I do . . . and I am convinced he is more deeply seated in the love and gratitude of the republicans, than in the Pharisaical homage of the Federal monarchists. for he was no monarchist from preference of his judgment. the soundness of that gave him correct views of the rights of man, and his severe justice devoted him to them. he has often declared to me that he considered our new constitution as an experiment on the practicability of republican government, and with what dose of liberty man could be trusted for his own good: that he was determined the experiment should have a fair trial, and would lose the last drop of his blood in support of it. . . .

“These are my opinions of General Washington, which I would vouch at the judgment seat of god, having been formed on an acquaintance of 30. years . . . I felt on his death, with my countrymen, that ‘verily a great man hath fallen this day in Israel’” (Thomas Jefferson to Walter Jones, January 2, 1814).

High praise, indeed! And higher still coming from a man the caliber of Thomas Jefferson! As Jefferson noted, he was hardly the only person to share these elevated feelings. Most Americans at the time looked upon Washington as an exalted figure – a national savior of sorts.

Benjamin Franklin, a man whose own unique talents and achievements had few equals, had high esteem for Washington. When it came time to elect a new president under the Constitution, Franklin had only one man in mind: “General Washington is the man that all our eyes are fixed on for President, and what little influence I may have, is devoted to him” (Benjamin Franklin to M. Le Veillard, June 8, 1788).

John and Abigail Adams both had high praise for the man. John Adams noted: “He is brave, wise, generous and humane” (John Adams to William Tudor, June 20, 1775). And after meeting Washington in person, Abigail privately told John: “I was struck with General Washington, You had prepared me to entertain a favorable opinion of him, but I thought the one half was not told me. Dignity with ease, and complacency, the Gentleman and Soldier look agreeably blended in him. Modesty marks every line and feature of his face” (Abigail Adams to John Adams, July 16, 1775).

In his autobiography, John Adams likewise praised Washington as the principal man of the age. He wrote: “I thought him a perfectly honest Man, with an amiable and excellent heart, and the most important Character at that time among Us, for he was the center of our Union” (John Adams, Autobiography, 1777).

The Marquis de Lafayette, the famous Frenchman who assisted in our War for Independence, once observed:

“This great man has no enemies but those of his own country, and yet every noble and sensitive soul must love the excellent qualities of his heart . . . His honesty, his candor, his sensitivity, his virtue in the full sense of the word are above all praise” (Marquis de Lafayette to Baron von Steuben, March 12, 1778).

Another French observer wrote:

“General Washington conducts himself with his usual wisdom. It conciliates to him more and more the respect and affection of the people. After a war of eight years, during which he has scarcely ever left his army, and has never taken any repose, he has received the news of the peace with the greatest joy. It made him shed tears, and he said it was the happiest hour of his life . . . He will always be the first citizen of the United States . . . all the world is agreed touching his republican virtues, and agreed that there is no character more eminent among those who have taken part in this grand revolution” (Chevalier de La Luzerne to the Comte de Vergennes, March 29, 1783).

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Benjamin Rush, another prominent figure of the day, spoke extravagantly of Washington’s character: “His zeal, his disinterestedness, his activity, his politeness, and his manly behavior . . . have captivated the hearts of the public and his friends. He seems to be one of those illustrious heroes whom providence raises up once in three or four hundred years to save a nation from ruin . . . he has so much martial dignity in his deportment that you would distinguish him to be a general and a soldier from among ten thousand people. There is not a king in Europe that would not look like a valet de chamber by his side” (Benjamin Rush to Thomas Ruston, October 29, 1775).

At the height of the Revolution, Moses Hazen remarked to General Nathanael Greene that Washington “is the very Idol of His Country, and who I love, regard, and Esteem, as one of the best men since the Creation of Adam” (Moses Hazen to Nathanael Greene, July 24, 1780). General Greene had similar praise for his superior officer. Not long after Hazen made his statements, General Greene explained:

“It is my opinion that General Washington’s influence will do more than all the Assemblies upon the Continent. I always thought him exceeding popular, but in many places he is little less than adored; and universally admired. His influence in this Country might possibly effect something great” (Nathanael Greene, January 10, 1781).

In 1791, a newspaper, the Connecticut Courant, gushed with praise for the nation’s first chief executive:

“Many a private man might make a great President; but will there ever be a President who will make so great a man as WASHINGTON?” (Connecticut Courant, June 20, 1791, in John P. Kaminski, ed., The Founders on the Founders: Word Portraits from the American Revolutionary Era, 505).

Shortly after Washington’s death, Timothy Dwight made this observation:

“Wherever he appeared, an instinctive awe and veneration attended him on the part of all men. Every man, however great in his own opinion, or in reality, shrunk in his presence, and became conscious of an inferiority, which he never felt before. Whilst he encouraged every man, particularly every stranger, and peculiarly ever diffident man, and raised him to self possession, no sober person, however secure he might think himself of his esteem, ever presumed to draw too near him” (Timothy Dwight, “Discourse on the Character of Washington,” February 22, 1800).

John Marshall, the fourth chief justice of the Supreme Court, shared the sentiment so often expressed that Washington was the “greatest man in the world.” Days after General Washington’s resignation, Marshall stated:

“At length then the military career of the greatest Man on earth is closed. May happiness attend him wherever he goes. May he long enjoy those blessings he has secured to his Country. When I speak or think of that superior Man my full heart overflows with gratitude. Ma he ever experience from his Countrymen those attentions which such sentiments of themselves produce” (John Marshall to James Monroe, January 3, 1784).

These few lines from John Price demonstrate the awe people had for the General of their blessed Revolution: “Immortal Washington . . . has outshined and Eclipsed all Asiatic, African, and European Generals, and Commanders from the Creation of the World, to this Day” (John Price to John Jay, October 29, 1783).

Samuel Shaw, a distinguished military officer under Washington, expressed his keen feelings about his General in these words:

“Our army love our General very much, but yet they have one thing against him, which is the little care he takes of himself in action. His personal bravery, and the desire he has of animating his troops by example, make him fearless of any danger. This, while it makes him appear great, occasions us much uneasiness. But Heaven, who has hitherto been his shield, I hope will still continue to guard so valuable a life” (Samuel Shaw to Francis Show, January 7, 1777).

William Hooper once wrote of Washington’s invaluable role in maintaining and securing the Revolution:

“When it shall be consistent with policy to give the history of that man from his first introduction into our service, how often America has been rescued from ruin by the mere strength of his genius, conduct & courage encountering every obstacle that want of money, men, arms, Ammunition could throw in his way, an impartial World will say with you that he is the Greatest Man on Earth. Misfortunes are the Element in which he shines. They are the Groundwork on which his picture appears to the greatest advantage. He rises superior to them all, they serve as foils to his fortitude, and as stimulants to bring into view those great qualities which in the serenity of life his great modesty keeps concealed. I could fill the side in his praise, but anything I can say cannot equal his Merits” (William Hooper to Robert Morris, February 1, 1777).

Washington’s fame was celebrated throughout Europe as well as America – even in the midst of the War for Independence. While on assignment in France, Benjamin Franklin wrote to Washington: “I frequently hear the old Generals of this martial Country, (who study the Maps of America, and mark upon them all your Operations) speak with sincere Approbation & great Applause of your Conduct, and join in giving you the Character of one of the greatest Captains of the Age” (Benjamin Franklin to George Washington, March 5, 1780).

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King George III, the tyrant who abuses prompted the Americans into fighting for their Liberty and declaring Independence from Britain, developed an interesting opinion of Washington after the war. Rufus King recorded a conversation he had with Benjamin West who had spoken with King George III about affairs in America. King’s account reads:

“[I]n regard to General Washington, he [King George] told him [West] since his [Washington’s] resignation that in his opinion “that act closing and finishing what had gone before and viewed in connection with it, placed him in a light the most distinguished of any man living, and that he thought him the greatest character of the age”” (Rufus King, May 3, 1797, in King, The Life and Correspondence of Rufus King, Vol. 3, 545).

It is likewise my estimation that George Washington was one of the “greatest Captains of the Age,” that he was an “illustrious hero” whom the God of Heaven raised up to save his country, and that he was the foremost of the indispensable men who established American Liberty. My own religious creed and the impressions of the Holy Spirit on my soul cause me to declare that George Washington was indeed raised up by the hand of the Lord to preside over the founding of this Republic. I am proud to live in a nation founded and shaped by George Washington.

George Washington’s guiding light, the thing that propelled him to the greatness ascribed to him by his peers, was his inner conviction about God. Though it is common today to call Washington and other Founding Fathers “Deists,” or, worse, “atheists,” the fact is that Washington was a deeply committed Christian. Washington issued the following General Orders  to his fighting men on May 2, 1788.

“The Commander in Chief directs that divine Service be performed every sunday at 11 oClock in those Brigades to which there are Chaplains—those which have none to attend the places of worship nearest to them—It is expected that Officers of all Ranks will by their attendence set an Example to their men.

“While we are zealously performing the duties of good Citizens and soldiers we certainly ought not to be inattentive to the higher duties of Religion—To the distinguished Character of Patriot, it should be our highest Glory to add the more distinguished Character of Christian—The signal Instances of providential Goodness which we have experienced and which have now almost crowned our labours with complete Success, demand from us in a peculiar manner the warmest returns of Gratitude & Piety to the Supreme Author of all Good.”

Washington not only commanded his soldiers to worship God, but he frequently mentioned his personal belief in God and encouraged his countrymen to be faithful and virtuous. Washington was particularly convinced that God had intervened on America’s behalf during the War for Independence, as were most Americans at the time. One time he affirmed:

“The man must be bad indeed who can look upon the events of the American Revolution without feeling the warmest gratitude towards the great Author of the Universe whose divine interposition was so frequently manifested in our behalf—And it is my earnest prayer that we may so conduct ourselves as to merit a continuance of those blessings with which we have hitherto been favoured” (George Washington to Samuel Langdon, September 28, 1789).

Another time, Washington observed:

“The hand of Providence has been so conspicuous in all this, that he must be worse than an infidel that lacks faith, and more than wicked, that has not gratitude enough to acknowledge his obligations” (George Washington to Thomas Nelson, August 20, 1778).

In his First Inaugural Address as president, Washington was moved to comment that Americans were “bound to acknowledge” God’s hand in their Revolution:

“[I]t would be peculiarly improper to omit in this first official Act, my fervent supplications to that Almighty Being who rules over the Universe, who presides in the Councils of Nations, and whose providential aids can supply every human defect, that his benediction may consecrate to the liberties and happiness of the People of the United States, a Government instituted by themselves for these essential purposes: and may enable every instrument employed in its administration to execute with success, the functions allotted to his charge. In tendering this homage to the Great Author of every public and private good I assure myself that it expresses your sentiments not less than my own; nor those of my fellow-citizens at large, less than either. No People can be bound to acknowledge and adore the invisible hand, which conducts the Affairs of men more than the People of the United States. Every step, by which they have advanced to the character of an independent nation, seems to have been distinguished by some token of providential agency.”

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To Washington, God was the real Founder of America and of her inspired Constitution. During his immortal Farewell Address, President Washington made it clear that his convictions had not changed. He spoke a truth that is as applicable today as it was in 1796:

“Of all the dispositions and habits which lead to political prosperity, religion and morality are indispensable supports. In vain would that man claim the tribute of patriotism, who should labor to subvert these great pillars of human happiness, these firmest props of the duties of men and citizens. The mere politician, equally with the pious man, ought to respect and to cherish them. A volume could not trace all their connections with private and public felicity. Let it simply be asked: Where is the security for property, for reputation, for life, if the sense of religious obligation desert the oaths which are the instruments of investigation in courts of justice? And let us with caution indulge the supposition that morality can be maintained without religion. Whatever may be conceded to the influence of refined education on minds of peculiar structure, reason and experience both forbid us to expect that national morality can prevail in exclusion of religious principle.

“It is substantially true that virtue or morality is a necessary spring of popular government. The rule, indeed, extends with more or less force to every species of free government. Who that is a sincere friend to it can look with indifference upon attempts to shake the foundation of the fabric?”

In harmony with his public sentiments, President Washington wrote a letter to Protestant clergy wherein he asserted: “Religion and morality are the essential pillars of civil society” (George Washington to the Protestant Clergy of Philadelphia, March 3, 1797).

For his own part, Washington never failed to acknowledge the hand of the Lord. He noted:

“No Man has a more perfect Reliance on the all-wise, and powerful dispensations of the Supreme Being than I have nor thinks his aid more necessary” (George Washington to William Gordon, May 13, 1776).

By all accounts, General Washington was supernaturally protected in both the French and Indian War and the American Revolution. Washington, and others, ascribed his protection to God. After a particularly harrowing battle during the French and Indian War, Washington observed:

“But by the all-powerful dispensations of Providence, I have been protected beyond all human probability or expectation; for I had four bullets through my coat, and two horses shot under me, yet escaped unhurt, although death was leveling my companions on every side of me” (George Washington to John A. Washington, July 18, 1755).

The Indians involved in the same battle noted that Washington seemed to be under the protection of God and could not be killed. One Indian chief recounted the following to General Washington:

“I called to my young men and said, mark yon tall and daring warrior? He is of the red-coat tribe – he hath an Indian’s wisdom, and his warriors fight as we do – himself alone exposed.

“Quick, let your aim be certain, and he dies. Our rifles were leveled, rifles which, but for you, knew not how to miss – ‘twas all in vain, a power mightier than we, shielded you.

“Seeing you were under the special guardianship of the Great Spirit, we immediately ceased to fire at you . . . there is something bids me speak in the voice of prophecy: Listen! The Great Spirit protects that man, and guides his destinies – he will become the chief of nations, and a people yet unborn will hail him as the founder of a mighty empire. I am come to pay homage to the man who is the particular favorite of Heaven, and who can never die in battle” (Bob Gingrich, Founding Fathers vs. History Revisionists, 29-30).

Washington did not utter idle words. As the quotations thus far demonstrate conclusively, Washington was a man who said what he meant and did what he said he would do. He wasn’t afraid to put himself in harm’s way for his beliefs or risk his life for his country. Thus, when Washington said he believed in God, he meant it and did all he could to show his devotion.

As frequently as his demanding public service allowed, George Washington attended Christian worship services. In fact, Washington donated money for the construction of Christ Church near his home. He also attended Pohick Church in which, according to numerous sources, Washington served as a vestryman for some twenty years. Washington also kept a prayer journal and had a personal copy of the Bible which he routinely read and which was donated to Christ Church after his death. It is beyond dispute that George Washington was a Christian who actively practiced his faith.

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In addition to upholding Christian values, Washington lived by a strict personal code of conduct. He wrote up this code into 110 “Rules of Civility and Decent Behavior in Company and Conversation.” Numbers 108 and 110 are the most relevant and give us a peek into Washington’s outlook on life: “When you speak of God or his attributes, let it be seriously & with reverence.” And, finally: “Labor to keep alive in your breast that little spark of celestial fire called conscience.”

From all credible accounts and eyewitness statements, we can conclude that Washington was a good, honest, upright man. He was a Christian with a high sense of honor and integrity. He was sometimes brutally honest. He was calculated and exercise wise judgement. He was a man of boldness and bravery. He was a supreme patriot who gave his life to the cause of Liberty.

One final aspect of Washington’s influence will be discussed. More than almost any other Founding Father, George Washington pushed for a new federal constitution to replace the failing Articles of Confederation. Viewing the proceedings of the nation he loved and had fought so mightily for from his retirement at Mount Vernon made Washington uncomfortable. He saw that the Union must collapse unless reformed.

A few quotes show Washington’s apprehensions:

“That it is necessary to revise, and amend the articles of Confederation, I entertain no doubt . . . Yet, something must be done, or the fabrick must fall. It certainly is tottering!” (George Washington to John Jay, May 18, 1786).

“No man in the United States is or can be more deeply impressed with the necessity of a reform in our present confederation than myself. No man, perhaps, has felt the bad effects of it more sensibly; for to the defects thereof, and want of powers in Congress, may justly be ascribed the prolongation of the war and consequently the expenses occasioned by it. More than half the perplexities I have experienced in the course of my command, and almost the whole of the difficulties and distress of the army, have their origin here” (George Washington to Alexander Hamilton, March 31, 1783).

“Let us look to our National character, and to things beyond the present period. No morn ever dawned more favourably than ours did; and no day was ever more clouded than the present! Wisdom, and good examples are necessary at this time to rescue the political machine from the impending storm. Virginia has now an opportunity to set the latter, and has enough of the former, I hope, to take the lead in promoting this great and arduous work. Without some alteration in our political creed, the superstructure we have been seven years raising at the expence of so much blood and treasure, must fall. We are fast verging to anarchy and confusion!” (George Washington to James Madison, November 5, 1786).

Suffice it to say that Washington foresaw the collapse of the fledgling American government unless the constitution was immediately overhauled. Washington urged and encouraged his fellow patriots to step forward and rescue the Republic. Eventually, a convention was called and Washington was adopted as its presiding head. After months of careful deliberation, the convention produced the U.S. Constitution, a document I consider to be literally inspired by Almighty God.

George Washington approved the document and, upon signing his name to it, remarked:

“Should the states reject this excellent constitution, the probability is that an opportunity will never again offer to cancel another in peace – the next will be drawn in blood” (Allison, Parry, Skousen, The Real George Washington, 490-491).

Shortly thereafter, during the constitutional ratification process, Washington remarked:

“No one can rejoice more than I do at every step taken by the People of this great Country to preserve the Union—establish good order & government—and to render the Nation happy at home & respected abroad. No Country upon Earth ever had it more in its power to attain these blessings than United America. Wonderously strange then, & much to be regretted indeed would it be, were we to neglect the means, and to stray from the road to which the finger of Providence has so manifestly pointed. I cannot believe it will ever come to pass! The great Author of all good has not conducted us so far on the Road to happiness and glory to withdraw from us, in the hour of need, his beneficent support” (George Washington to Benjamin Lincoln, June 29, 1788).

When the Constitution was ratified, Washington became its greatest champion. Of this charter, he publicly declared: “[T]he Constitution is the guide which I never can abandon” (George Washington to Boston Selectmen, July 28, 1795). Another time he wrote: “The Constitution of the United States, and the laws made under it, must mark the line of my official conduct” (George Washington to Edmund Randolph, 1790).

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After a successful term in office, President Washington was overjoyed at the success America had seen directly because of the new Constitution. It was the American People’s mission, he believed, to show the world that constitutional republicanism is the soundest system of government ever devised:

“To complete the [A]merican character, it remains for the citizens of the United States, to shew to the world, that the reproach heretofore cast on Republican Governments for their want of stability, is without foundation, when that Government is the deliberate choice of an enlightened people: and I am fully persuaded, that every well-wisher to the happiness & prosperity of this Country, will evince by his conduct, that we live under a government of laws; and that while we preserve inviolate our national faith, we are desirous to live in amity with all mankind” (George Washington to the citizens of Alexandria, July 4, 1793).

The way in which America could show the world the wisdom of the Constitution was, simply enough, to follow it! Indeed, Washington strongly believed that all citizens owed strict obedience to the Constitution. He was most emphatic on this point. In his Farewell Address, which ought to be required reading for all Americans, he declared:

“This government, the offspring of our own choice, uninfluenced and unawed, adopted upon full investigation and mature deliberation, completely free in its principles, in the distribution of its powers, uniting security with energy, and containing within itself a provision for its own amendment, has a just claim to your confidence and your support. Respect for its authority, compliance with its laws, acquiescence in its measures, are duties enjoined by the fundamental maxims of true liberty. The basis of our political systems is the right of the people to make and to alter their constitutions of government. But the Constitution which at any time exists, till changed by an explicit and authentic act of the whole people, is sacredly obligatory upon all. The very idea of the power and the right of the people to establish government presupposes the duty of every individual to obey the established government” (George Washington, Farewell Address, 1796).

Much of our constitutional form of government, and, indeed, the U.S. Constitution itself, came about due to George Washington’s instrumentality. He used his influence to persuade his countrymen to draft a constitution which would enshrine the rule of law, protect natural rights, and limit government while empowering it to fully protect the citizens of the country. He also used his influence to urge adoption of the new Constitution. And, then, he worked hard for eight years as president to enforce and maintain that sacred document.

Yes, it was George Washington, the Father of our Country, who really popularized constitutional government in the United States. His indomitable influence and skillful leadership brought the government into being and carried it through its first eight years. He set in stone the practice of a president only serving two terms and then graciously retiring – a tradition faithfully followed until the Marxist demagogue FDR served four consecutive terms, prompting a formal change in the law. Washington was also responsible for adding the words “so help me God” to the end of his presidential oath. All eyes were on Washington in the nation’s critical moments and he guided her through the rocky waters by following the Constitution, applying his own native judgment, and following God’s laws in his personal conduct.

George Washington was, and remains, a true hero. Few heroes in fact have been as worthy of the appellation as Washington. It is, therefore, a true sign of cultural rot that many Americans are beginning to spurn and despise this incredible man. It is rare in history that a man accomplished so much good for his nation, yet, in time, became so hated. A recent and ongoing incident demonstrates this growing hostility.

In San Francisco – perhaps the epicenter of all that is wrong with America – a school recently wanted to destroy an old George Washington mural painted one of its walls. According to the school, the mural “traumatizes students” and “glorifies slavery” and “genocide.” To allegedly protect their students from the image of George Washington, the school decided to paint over the mural, but then decided to simply cover it. Heaven forbid we allow school students to learn about the Father of their Country, the Commander-in-Chief of the Revolution, and the first president of the United States!

Because of the communist cancer that has almost totally taken over public schooling, academia, Hollywood, the press, and government, our Founding Fathers are being vilified as violent “rebels,” self-serving aristocrats, bigots, racists, and religiously-motivated oppressors. Agencies within our government have even gone so far as to classify the Sons of Liberty and our Founding Fathers as “domestic terrorists,” implying that anyone who believes like they did are also “terrorists.” And now the FBI is calling “conspiracy theorists” an extremist threat.

Yes, fighting for Freedom and truth is extreme and revolutionary, especially when the government is antagonistic to Liberty. Historian Charles Beard is said to have observed: “You need only reflect that one of the best ways to get yourself a reputation as a dangerous citizen these days is to go about repeating the very phrases which our founding fathers used in the struggle for independence” (Charles A. Beard, in M. Kenneth Creamer, The Reformation of Union State Sovereignty, 265).

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This sentiment is, unfortunately, accurate. And there was no more “dangerous citizen” in American history than George Washington. He was the “rebel” leader – the point of the patriotic spear. He was formidable to tyrants and traitors, but a true friend to Liberty. He was a patriot in every sense of the term. He was then as he ought to be now “first in the hearts of his countrymen” (Richard Henry Lee, Funeral Oration on the Death of George Washington, December 28, 1799).

Washington’s shining example will always inspire sincere American patriots. His words will always buoy his countrymen. His spirit will always ride alongside those wishing to rid their country of tyranny and to defend Freedom. God help us remember and emulate George Washington, the most indispensable of indispensable men!

Zack Strong,

August 21, 2019.